Rainmaking Rituals: A Comprehensive Study of Two Kenyan Societies Rainmaking Rituals: A Comprehensive Study of Two Kenyan Societies

Abstract

A comparative examination of the public rainmaking rituals in Kitui District and the secret rainmaking rituals in Bunyore location of Kakamega District, both in Kenya, reveals that public rituals are more susceptible to rapid social change than those of secret. Secondly, although rainmaking rituals are a response to scarcity or unreliability that are rainfall, such rituals can be found even in the areas of adequate rainfall either because the people once lived in an area of rainfall scarcity or the rainmakers are strangers who came from such areas. Thirdly, the efficacy of rainmaking rituals is based on faith, and due to the involvement of the supernatural, they have socio-psychological implications on the participants.

A comparative examination of the public rainmaking rituals in Kitui District and the secret rainmaking rituals in Bunyore location of Kakamega District, both in Kenya, reveals that public rituals are more susceptible to rapid social change than those of secret. Secondly, although rainmaking rituals are a response to scarcity or unreliability that are rainfall, such rituals can be found even in the areas of adequate rainfall either because the people once lived in an area of rainfall scarcity or the rainmakers are strangers who came from such areas. Thirdly, the efficacy of rainmaking rituals is based on faith, and due to the involvement of the supernatural, they have socio-psychological implications on the participants.

Journal

African study monographs   [List of Volumes]

African study monographs 8(2), 71-85, 1987  [Table of Contents]

Kyoto University

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID) :
    110000066280
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID) :
    AA10626444
  • Text Lang :
    ENG
  • Article Type :
    Departmental Bulletin Paper
  • ISSN :
    02851601
  • Databases :
    NII-ELS  IR 

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