A Missing Link Between a High Salt Intake and Blood Pressure Increase

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It is widely accepted that a high sodium intake triggers blood pressure rise. However, only one-third of the normotensive subjects were reported to show salt-sensitivity in their blood pressure. Many factors have been proposed as causes of salt-sensitive hypertension, but none of them provides a satisfactory explanation. We propose, on the basis of accumulated data, that the reduced activity of the kallikrein-kinin system in the kidney may provide this link. Renal kallikrein is secreted by the distal connecting tubular cells and all kallikrein-kinin system components are distributed along the collecting ducts in the distal nephron. Bradykinin generated is immediately destroyed by carboxypeptidase Y-like exopeptidase and neutral endopeptidase, both quite independent from the kininases in plasma, such as angiotensin converting enzyme. The salt-sensitivity of the blood pressure depends largely upon ethnicity and potassium intake. Interestingly, potassium and ATP-sensitive potassium (K<sub>ATP</sub>) channel blockers accelerate renal kallikrein secretion and suppress blood pressure rises in animal hypertension models. Measurement of urinary kallikrein may become necessary in salt-sensitive normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Furthermore, pharmaceutical development of renal kallikrein releasers, such as K<sub>ATP</sub> channel blockers, and renal kininase inhibitors, such as ebelactone B, may lead to the development of novel antihypertensive drugs.<br>

収録刊行物

  • Journal of pharmacological sciences  

    Journal of pharmacological sciences 100(5), 370-390, 2006-05-15 

    The Japanese Pharmacological Society

参考文献:  168件

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各種コード

  • NII論文ID(NAID)
    10018238332
  • NII書誌ID(NCID)
    AA11806667
  • 本文言語コード
    ENG
  • 資料種別
    REV
  • ISSN
    13478613
  • NDL 記事登録ID
    7963157
  • NDL 雑誌分類
    ZS51(科学技術--薬学)
  • NDL 請求記号
    Z53-D199
  • データ提供元
    CJP書誌  NDL  J-STAGE 
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