The Analysis of Trends in Induced Abortion in Japan : An Increasing Consequence among Adolescents

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Author(s)

    • BABA Sachiko
    • Department of Social and Envipartment of Social and Environmental Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine
    • TSUJITA Satoshi
    • Department of Social and Envipartment of Social and Environmental Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine
    • MORIMOTO Kanehisa
    • Department of Social and Envipartment of Social and Environmental Medicine, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine

Abstract

Objectives:The purpose of this study was to examine trends in induced abortions in Japan. Methods:The Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare compiled data on induced abortions, live births, and the population of women aged 15-49 years. These data were provided by 47 prefectures in Japan and were used to examine the number of induced abortions and various characteristics of women who received abortions from 1955 through 2001. We examined abortion numbers, abortion ratios (number of legal abortions per 1,000 live births) and abortion rates (number of legal abortions per 1,000 women aged 15-49). We were particularly interested in examining abortion trends among adolescents. These trends were also compared to those in the United States. Results:A total of 341,588 legal induced abortions were reported in Japan in 2001, representing a 2.5% increase from 1998 to 2001. From 1998 to 2001, the abortion ratio (292) increased by 5.4%;from 1996 through 2001, the abortion rate (11.8) increased by 8.3%. Women less than 20 years old contributed most to these increases. In 1999, the abortion ratio among Japanese adolescents was 5.7 times as high as the ratio among U.S. adolescents, while the abortion rate among U.S. adolescents was 1.8 times as high as the rate among Japanese adolescents. Conclusions:Recent increases in induced abortion among Japanese women may be related to several factors, including changes in sexual behavior among adolescents and a decline in their use of contraceptives. More appropriate educational efforts and interventions are needed to prevent unintended pregnancies.

Journal

  • Environmental health and preventive medicine

    Environmental health and preventive medicine 10(1), 9-15, 2005-01

    The Japanese Society for Hygiene

References:  34

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    110002694619
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA1108348X
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    ART
  • ISSN
    1342078X
  • Data Source
    CJP  NII-ELS  J-STAGE 
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