Eosinophil Peroxidase Deficiency in Humans and Mice

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Abstract

Eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) is one of the granule proteins in the eosinophil-specific granules. EPO is considered an important effector molecule in the host defense mechanisms against various parasite infections and also contributes to the pathophysiology of allergic diseases. However, the detailed function of EPO in these immune-mediated inflammatory responses has not been fully understood. EPO deficiency has been reported for the first time in humans. Recently, we have found that eosinophils of New Zealand White (NZW) mice lack EPO activity. EPO-deficient mice are advantageous in performing various experiments which cannot be performed upon human subjects. Here we present a brief review on the similarities and differences between human and murine EPO deficiency. NZW mice are useful not only as a murine model of human EPO deficiency, but also as a tool for elucidating the biological role of EPO in particular diseases such as helminth infections and allergies.

Journal

  • ACTA HISTOCHEMICA ET CYTOCHEMICA

    ACTA HISTOCHEMICA ET CYTOCHEMICA 30(3), 231-236, 1997-06-01

    JAPAN SOCIETY OF HISTOCHEMISTRY AND CYTOCHEMISTRY

References:  31

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    10008606746
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA00508022
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    REV
  • ISSN
    00445991
  • Data Source
    CJP  J-STAGE 
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