Is There a Third Peripheral Catecholaminergic System? Endogenous Dopamine as an Autocrine/Paracrine Substance Derived from Plasma DOPA and Inactivated by Conjugation

この論文にアクセスする

この論文をさがす

著者

    • GOLDSTEIN David S.
    • Clinical Neuroscience Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health
    • MEZEY Eva
    • Clinical Neuroscience Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health
    • YAMAMOTO Toshimasa
    • Clinical Neuroscience Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health
    • ANEMAN Anders
    • Departments of Physiology and Clinical Physiology, University of Goteborg
    • FRIBERG Peter
    • Departments of Physiology and Clinical Physiology, University of Goteborg
    • EISENHOFER Graeme
    • Clinical Neuroscience Branch, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health

抄録

In mammals, the sympathetic neurotransmitter is norepinephrine (NE), and the main adrenomedullary hormone is epinephrine (EPI). The sources and physiological roles of the third endogenous catecholamine, dopamine (DA), outside the brain have been obscure. Several lines of evidence suggest that in the periphery, rather than DA serving only as the precursor for the active compounds, released from sympathetic nerves and the adrenal medulla, DA may also act as an autocrine/paracrine regulator of local organ function. Thus, in the kidneys, most of DA formation appears to be from proximal tubular uptake of plasma DOPA, and binding of locally formed DA to dopaminergic receptors decreases Na/K ATPase activity and thereby accentuates natriuresis. In the gastric mucosa, DA may modulate sodium absorption and acid secretion. Recent clinical and laboratory animal evidence has indicated that the lungs and mesenteric organs contribute substantially to total body production and metabolism of DA. Generation of DA in non-noradrenergic, non-adrenergic cells can explain why human urine contains higher concentrations of DA and its metabolites than of NE and its metabolites. The vast preponderance of plasma DA in humans is sulfoconjugated. Since patients with sympathoneural failure have normal plasma levels of DA sulfate, one may speculate that the sulfoconjugating mechanism is relatively independent of sympathetic nerves and acts to localize DA effects and inactivate DA entering the circulation. These considerations lead to the concept of a third peripheral catecholaminergic system, where DA derived from plasma DOPA acts as an autocrine/paracrine substance and is inactivated by conjugation. (<i>Hypertens Res</i> 1995; 18 Suppl. I: S93-S99)

収録刊行物

  • Hypertension research : clinical and experimental : official journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension

    Hypertension research : clinical and experimental : official journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension 18, S93-S99, 1995-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Hypertension

参考文献:  76件中 1-76件 を表示

各種コード

ページトップへ