Urinary Excretion of Free Dopamine and Digoxinlike Substances Correlates with Endogenous Secretion of Insulin in Normotensive Adults, but Not in Hypertensive Subjects

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Author(s)

    • NISHIMURA Masato
    • Department of Clinical Laboratory and Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine
    • TAKAHASHI Hakuo
    • Department of Clinical Sciences and Laboratory Medicine, Kansai Medical University
    • NANBU Akira
    • Department of Clinical Laboratory and Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine
    • HABUCHI Yoshizumi
    • Department of Clinical Laboratory and Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine
    • FUJITA Naohisa
    • Department of Clinical Laboratory and Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine
    • NAKANISHI Tadashi
    • Department of Clinical Laboratory and Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine
    • YOSHIMURA Manabu
    • Department of Clinical Laboratory and Medicine, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine

Abstract

We investigated whether urinary excretion of free dopamine is related with the humoral factors which affect Na<sup>+</sup>, K<sup>+</sup> ATPase activity in the kidneys. Subjects were 51 adults admitted in a hospital without renal insufficiency: they were divided into normotensive (<i>n</i>=36, 60±3 years old, 122±3/73±2mmHg) and hypertensive groups (<i>n</i>=15, 65±5 years old, 157±6/91±2mmHg). Urinary excretion of free dopamine was significantly and positively correlated with urinary excretion of C-peptide immunoreactivity of insulin (CPR) (<i>r</i>=0.451, <i>p</i>=0.014) in normotensive subjects, but not in hypertensive subjects (<i>r</i>= 0.155, <i>p</i>=0.668). Urinary excretion of endogenous digoxinlike substances (EDLS) was also significantly and positively correlated with urinary CPR (<i>r</i>=0.500, <i>p</i>=0.006) in normotensive subjects, but not in hypertensive subjects (<i>r</i>=0.275, <i>p</i>=0.363). In normotensive subjects, urinary excretion of free dopamine and EDLS may be regulated at least in part by insulin secreted endogenously. In hypertensive subjects, however, this regulatory mechanism of the diuretic factors, such as insulin, EDLS and dopamine, is thought to be deranged, which might result in decompensation of a diuretic and antidiuretic balance leading to blood pressure elevation. (<i>Hypertens Res</i> 1995; 18 Suppl. I: S191-S192)

Journal

  • Hypertension Research

    Hypertension Research 18, S191-S192, 1995-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Hypertension

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