Penetration Behavior of Calcium Ferrite Melts into Hematite Substrate

Access this Article

Search this Article

Author(s)

Abstract

Effects of adding SiO<sub>2</sub> or Al<sub>2</sub>O<sub>3</sub> on the penetration characteristics of calcium ferrite (CF) melts into hematite substrate with the different percentage of porosity were examined, and were discussed from the viewpoints of the relation to the solubility gap, ΔFe<sub>2</sub>O<sub>3</sub> (mol%), viscosity and surface tension of the CF-based melts.<br>In case of dense hematite substrate with 5% porosity, the penetration depth of CF melts into hematite substrate was depressed by the addition of SiO<sub>2</sub> or Al<sub>2</sub>O<sub>3</sub>, and the addition of SiO<sub>2</sub> was more effective than that of Al<sub>2</sub>O<sub>3</sub>. Moreover, the penetration of CF-based melts along grain boundaries into hematite substrate did not take place, and melts/hematite interface moved down by dissolution of solid hematite into these melts. The penetration depth of CF-based melts into hematite substrate was mostly determined by ΔFe<sub>2</sub>O<sub>3</sub> (mol%), which meant that the dissolution of hematite into melts was rate-determine.<br>In case of porous hematite substrate with 15% porosity, the penetration of CF-based melts along grain boundaries into hematite substrate occurred, and the penetration depth was 10 times deeper than the case of dense hematite substrate with 5% porosity for each slag. The penetration depth of CF melts was increased by the addition of SiO<sub>2</sub> due to the decrease of melting temperature in the calcium ferrite system. The penetration depth of CF melts with the addition of Al<sub>2</sub>O<sub>3</sub> was very similar to that of CF melts. These melts penetrated into hematite substrate with crystallization (solid) due to the increase of the melting temperature in calcium ferrite system by the dissolution of hematite into the liquid phase. The penetration depth of CF-based melts into hematite substrate was dominated by the ratio between the surface tension and viscosity of melts taking the suspension-corrected into consideration.

Journal

  • ISIJ International

    ISIJ International 49(5), 687-692, 2009-05-15

    The Iron and Steel Institute of Japan

References:  20

  • <no title>

    MATSUMURA H.

    Tetsu-to-Hagane 82, 23, 1996

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    HIDA Y.

    Tetsu-to-Hagane 78, 23, 1993

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    OKAZAKI J.

    CAMP-ISIJ 13, 800, 2000

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    HIDA Y.

    Tetsu-to-Hagane 73, 1893, 1987

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    INAZUMI T.

    165th Nishiyama Memorial Seminar, 1997 25, 1997

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    HIDA Y.

    Tetsu-to-Hagane 78, 960, 1992

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    MAEDA T.

    ISIJ Int. 44, 2046, 2004

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    NAKASHIMA K.

    ISIJ Int. 44, 2052, 2004

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    LISTER D. H.

    Trans. Br. Ceram. Soc. 66, 293, 1967

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    WATANABE S.

    CAMP-ISIJ 7, 1025, 1994

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    WATANABE S.

    CAMP-ISIJ 8, 1087, 1995

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    PHILLIPS B.

    J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 42, 413, 1959

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    PHILLIPS B.

    J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 41, 448,449, 1958

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    GERMAN R. M.

    Liquid Phase Sintering 91, 1985

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    MORINAGA K.

    Ceramic Microstructures 543, 1998

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    IIDA T.

    Viscosity of Molten Slag and Glass 105, 2003

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    YAGI S.

    Kogyo-Kagaku-Zasshi 61, 1404, 1958

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    SAITOU N.

    Metall. Mater. Trans. B 34B, 509, 2003

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    Master Thesis (Kyushu University), 2008

    Cited by (1)

  • <no title>

    PHILLIPS B.

    J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 41, 445, 1958

    DOI  Cited by (2)

Codes

Page Top