Evaluation of the In vivo Radiosensitizing Activity of Etanidazole Using Tumor-bearing Chick Embryo

Access this Article

Author(s)

    • Abe Chiaki ABE Chiaki
    • Department of Life System, Institute of Technology and Science, Graduate School, The University of Tokushima
    • SHINMOTO Yuuya
    • Department of Life System, Institute of Technology and Science, Graduate School, The University of Tokushima
    • SANO Keiichiro
    • Department of Life System, Institute of Technology and Science, Graduate School, The University of Tokushima
    • NAKATA Hiroko
    • Department of Life System, Institute of Technology and Science, Graduate School, The University of Tokushima
    • TERAOKA Mizue
    • Department of Life System, Institute of Technology and Science, Graduate School, The University of Tokushima
    • ENDO Yoshio
    • Central Research Resource Branch, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University
    • MAEZAWA Hiroshi
    • Institute of Health Biosciences, Graduate School, The University of Tokushima
    • MASUNAGA Shin-ichiro
    • Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University
    • NAKATA Eiji
    • Department of Life System, Institute of Technology and Science, Graduate School, The University of Tokushima
    • HORI Hitoshi
    • Department of Life System, Institute of Technology and Science, Graduate School, The University of Tokushima

Abstract

Chick embryos have been used as alternative experimental animals in various research fields, including virology, immunology, toxicology, oncology, and embryology. Until now, there have been no <i>in vivo</i> models using chick embryo to evaluate radiosensitizing activity. Here, the <i>in vivo</i> radiosensitizing activity of etanidazole, a well-known hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, was evaluated using tumor-bearing chick embryo. On the basis of tumor growth, drug administration and X-ray irradiation were performed on day 15 chick embryo, with the endpoint being day 18 chick embryo. In day 15 chick embryo, an X-ray irradiation dose of equal or less than 10 Gy did not cause significant tumor growth suppression. Intravenous administration of equal or less than 1.0 mg of etanidazole did not cause tumor growth suppression. Neither doses of equal or less than 8 Gy of irradiation nor 1.0 mg of etanidazole caused fatality of the chick embryo. On the basis of these results, we evaluated the radiosensitizing effect of a combination treatment with 8 Gy of irradiation and 1.0 mg of etanidazole. As noted above, 1.0 mg of etanidazole alone and 8 Gy of irradiation alone did not show tumor growth suppression. In contrast, a combination treatment with 8 Gy of irradiation and 1.0 mg of etanidazole showed 35% of significant tumor growth suppression. Thus, we succeeded in evaluating the <i>in vivo</i> radiosensitizing activity of etanidazole using tumor-bearing chick embryo. These results suggest that the use of tumor-bearing chick embryo may be part of a promising system for evaluating radiosensitizing activity.

Journal

  • Journal of Radiation Research

    Journal of Radiation Research 52(2), 208-214, 2011-03-16

    Journal of Radiation Research Editorial Committee

References:  28

Cited by:  1

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    10027956760
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA00705792
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    Journal Article
  • ISSN
    04493060
  • NDL Article ID
    11011595
  • NDL Source Classification
    ZS45(科学技術--医学--放射線医学)
  • NDL Call No.
    Z53-P232
  • Data Source
    CJP  CJPref  NDL  J-STAGE 
Page Top