Genotypic Variations in Non-Structural Carbohydrate and Cell-Wall Components of the Stem in Rice, Sorghum, and Sugar Vane

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Author(s)

    • YOSHINAGA Satoshi
    • National Institute of Crop Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
    • TAKAI Toshiyuki
    • National Institute of Crop Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
    • ISHIMARU Tsutomu
    • National Institute of Crop Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
    • MAEDA Hideo
    • National Institute of Crop Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
    • NISHITANI Kazuhiko
    • Department of Developmental Biology and Neurosciences, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University
    • TERASHIMA Yoshifumi
    • Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences, Tropical Agriculture Research Front
    • GAU Mitsuru
    • National Agricultural Research Center for the Kyushu-Okinawa Region, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
    • KATO Naoki
    • National Agricultural Research Center for the Kyushu-Okinawa Region, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
    • MATSUOKA Makoto
    • National Agricultural Research Center for the Kyushu-Okinawa Region, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
    • KONDO Motohiko
    • National Institute of Crop Science, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization

Abstract

We evaluated genetic variations in the non-structural carbohydrate (NSC) and the cell-wall components of stem in rice, sorghum, and sugar cane to assess the potential suitability of these gramineous crops for bioethanol production. For NSC, the maximum soluble sugar concentration was highest in sugar cane, followed by sorghum with sucrose. The major NSC in rice was starch, but there were wide variations in the starch to soluble sugar ratios among the cultivars. The total concentration of cell-wall components was negatively correlated with the NSC concentration, indicating competition for carbon sources. Among the cell-wall components, lignin was relatively stable within each group. The major sugar species composing hemicellulose was xylose in all crop groups, but there were differences in composition, with a higher fraction of arabinose and glucose in rice as compared to the other crops. In rice, there was less lignin than in sorghum or sugar cane; this might be advantageous for the efficient saccharification of cellulose.

Journal

  • Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry

    Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry 75(6), 1104-1112, 2011-06-23

    Japan Society for Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Agrochemistry

References:  42

Cited by:  1

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    10029328070
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10824164
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    Journal Article
  • ISSN
    09168451
  • NDL Article ID
    11131950
  • NDL Source Classification
    ZR7(科学技術--農林水産--農産) // ZR2(科学技術--生物学--生化学) // ZP1(科学技術--化学・化学工業)
  • NDL Call No.
    Z53-G223
  • Data Source
    CJP  CJPref  NDL  J-STAGE 
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