Self-Reported Snoring Frequency and Incidence of Cardiovascular Disease : The Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS)

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Author(s)

    • NAGAYOSHI Mako
    • Public Health, Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University
    • TANIGAWA Takeshi
    • Department of Public Health, Doctoral Program in Social Medicine, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine
    • SAKURAI Susumu
    • Department of Public Health, Doctoral Program in Social Medicine, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine
    • OKADA Takeo
    • Osaka Medical Center for Health Science and Promotion
    • MAEDA Kenji
    • Public Health, Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University
    • OHIRA Tetsuya
    • Public Health, Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University
    • IMANO Hironori
    • Public Health, Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University
    • ISO Hiroyasu
    • Public Health, Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University

Abstract

<b>Background: </b>Although associations between snoring and cardiovascular disease have been reported in several prospective studies, there is limited evidence from Asian populations. The objective of this study was to determine if there is an association between self-reported snoring frequency and the incidence of cardiovascular disease in Japanese.<BR><b>Methods: </b>The subjects were 2350 men and 4163 women aged 40 to 69 years who lived in 3 communities in Japan. All subjects were participants in the Circulatory Risk in Communities Study (CIRCS) and were followed for 6 years. Incidence of cardiovascular disease during the follow-up period comprised events of myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, sudden cardiac death and stroke.<BR><b>Results: </b>During the 6-year follow-up period, 97 participants (56 men and 41 women) had cardiovascular events. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, self-reported snoring frequency was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events among women but not men. The hazard ratios (95% CI) for cardiovascular events were 0.9 (0.4–2.0) for sometimes snoring and 2.5 (1.0–6.1) for everyday snoring in women and 0.7 (0.3–1.3) and 1.0 (0.5–2.1), respectively, in men. Further adjustment for body mass index attenuated the association in women; the respective hazard ratios for cardiovascular events were 0.9 (0.4–1.9) and 2.1 (0.9–5.4).<BR><b>Conclusions: </b>Self-reported habitual snoring was associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events among Japanese women. Overweight may partly mediate this association.

Journal

  • Journal of Epidemiology

    Journal of Epidemiology 22(4), 295-301, 2012-07-01

    Japan Epidemiological Association

References:  37

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    10030784066
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10952696
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    ART
  • ISSN
    09175040
  • Data Source
    CJP  J-STAGE 
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