Sex differences in linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) in early modern Japan

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Author(s)

    • OYAMADA Joichi OYAMADA Joichi
    • Department of Oral Anatomy and Dental Anthropology, Unit of Basic Medical Sciences, Course of Medical and Dental Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University
    • KITAGAWA Yoshikazu KITAGAWA Yoshikazu
    • Department of Oral Anatomy and Dental Anthropology, Unit of Basic Medical Sciences, Course of Medical and Dental Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University
    • KATO Katsutomo [他] KATO Katsutomo
    • Department of Physical Therapy, Unit of Physical and Occupational Therapy, Course of Health Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University
    • TSURUMOTO Toshiyuki
    • Department of Macroscopic Morphology, Unit of Basic Medical Sciences, Course of Medical and Dental Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University
    • MANABE Yoshitaka
    • Department of Oral Anatomy and Dental Anthropology, Unit of Basic Medical Sciences, Course of Medical and Dental Sciences, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University

Abstract

In Japan's early modern period (1603–1867), also known as the Edo period, females were considered inferior to males. It is therefore plausible that boys were raised more solicitously than girls, and that girls were subject to various kinds of deprivation in early childhood. We compared the prevalence of linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) in the dentition of the skeletal remains of early modern Japanese samurai and commoners interred in an urban location (a castle town). Significant sex differences were found in the prevalence of LEH in both groups. As there is evidence that LEH prevalence reflects stress levels in early childhood, the significant differences between the sexes provide material evidence for the hypothesis that male offspring were given preferential treatment among both samurai and commoners in Edo period urban society.

Journal

  • Anthropological Science

    Anthropological Science 120(2), 97-101, 2012-08-01

    The Anthropological Society of Nippon

References:  35

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    10031057107
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10915022
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    ART
  • ISSN
    09187960
  • NDL Article ID
    023894363
  • NDL Call No.
    Z54-J370
  • Data Source
    CJP  NDL  J-STAGE 
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