Effects of Prolonged Stretching and Thermotherapy on Muscle Contracture of Immobilized Rat Soleus Muscle

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Author(s)

    • KONDO YASUTAKA
    • Department of Rehabilitation, Japanese Red Cross Nagasaki Genbaku Hospital
    • NAKANO JIRO
    • Department of Physical Therapy Science, Unit of Physical and Occupational Therapy Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
    • KATAOKA HIDEKI
    • Department of Locomotive Rehabilitation Science, Unit of Rehabilitation Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
    • YOKOYAMA SHINGO
    • Department of Locomotive Rehabilitation Science, Unit of Rehabilitation Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
    • HONDA YUICHIRO
    • Department of Locomotive Rehabilitation Science, Unit of Rehabilitation Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
    • ORIGUCHI TOMOKI
    • Department of Locomotive Rehabilitation Science, Unit of Rehabilitation Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
    • YOSHIMURA TOSHIRO
    • Department of Locomotive Rehabilitation Science, Unit of Rehabilitation Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
    • OKITA MINORU
    • Department of Locomotive Rehabilitation Science, Unit of Rehabilitation Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences

Abstract

[Purpose] We examined the effects of prolonged stretching and thermotherapy on muscle contracture of immobilized rat soleus muscles by determining ankle joint range of motion (ROM), collagen fibril arrangement in the endomysium and insoluble collagen content. [Methods] In the experimental group, bilateral ankle joints of each rat were fixed in full plantar flexion with plaster casts for four weeks. Then, the experimental group animals were randomly partitioned into five groups: 1) immobilization alone; and 2) spontaneous recovery, 3) prolonged stretching, 4) thermotherapy, and 5) prolonged stretching immediately following thermotherapy for 2 weeks after cast removal. Prolonged stretching of the soleus muscle (30 min/day) was conducted by maintaining the dorsiflexion position of the ankle joint. Thermotherapy consisted of immersion of bilateral hindlimbs (20 min/day) in hot water (42 °C). Under anesthesia, both treatments were performed six days per week during the two-week remobilization. [Results] Immobilization led to decreased ROM, collagen fibril movement in the endomysium and increased insoluble collagen. Prolonged stretching and the combination of stretching and thermotherapy accelerated amelioration of the ROM limitation and diminished collagen fibril movement. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that while thermotherapy does not exert a specific effect on muscle contracture, prolonged stretching can promote recovery.

[Purpose] We examined the effects of prolonged stretching and thermotherapy on muscle contracture of immobilized rat soleus muscles by determining ankle joint range of motion (ROM), collagen fibril arrangement in the endomysium and insoluble collagen content. [Methods] In the experimental group, bilateral ankle joints of each rat were fixed in full plantar flexion with plaster casts for four weeks. Then, the experimental group animals were randomly partitioned into five groups: 1) immobilization alone; and 2) spontaneous recovery, 3) prolonged stretching, 4) thermotherapy, and 5) prolonged stretching immediately following thermotherapy for 2 weeks after cast removal. Prolonged stretching of the soleus muscle (30 min/day) was conducted by maintaining the dorsiflexion position of the ankle joint. Thermotherapy consisted of immersion of bilateral hindlimbs (20 min/day) in hot water (42 °C). Under anesthesia, both treatments were performed six days per week during the two-week remobilization. [Results] Immobilization led to decreased ROM, collagen fibril movement in the endomysium and increased insoluble collagen. Prolonged stretching and the combination of stretching and thermotherapy accelerated amelioration of the ROM limitation and diminished collagen fibril movement. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that while thermotherapy does not exert a specific effect on muscle contracture, prolonged stretching can promote recovery.

Journal

  • Journal of Physical Therapy Science

    Journal of Physical Therapy Science 24(6), 541-547, 2012-07-31

    The Society of Physical Therapy Science

References:  31

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    10031076687
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10798949
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    ART
  • ISSN
    09155287
  • Data Source
    CJP  IR  J-STAGE 
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