Variation in floral scent compounds recognized by honeybees in Brassicaceae crop species

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Abstract

Floral scent attracts pollinators. We investigated the floral scent compounds recognized by pollinators in six Brassica crop species, including allogamous species with different genomes and autogamous species with two parental genomes and radish (Raphanus sativus). Biologically active compounds recognized by honeybees were screened from all floral compounds by combined gas chromatography–electroantennogram analysis and their profiles were determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Fourteen of the 52 compounds were active. All accessions had more than two active compounds, but the compounds greatly differed between the two genera. On the basis of similarities in whether active compounds were presence or absence, their amount and their composition ratio, we divided the Brassica accessions into three to five groups by cluster analyses. Most groups were composed of a mixture of allogamous and autogamous species sharing same genome, indicating that the variation depended on genome, not species. These results suggest that all species require pollinator visits for reproduction, despite their different reproductive systems. However, the inter-genus and intra-specific variations shown by the multiple groups within a species might cause different visitation frequencies by pollinators between genera and among accessions within a species, resulting in insufficient seed production in some accessions or species.

Floral scent attracts pollinators. We investigated the floral scent compounds recognized by pollinators in six <i>Brassica</i> crop species, including allogamous species with different genomes and autogamous species with two parental genomes and radish (<i>Raphanus sativus</i>). Biologically active compounds recognized by honeybees were screened from all floral compounds by combined gas chromatography–electroantennogram analysis and their profiles were determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Fourteen of the 52 compounds were active. All accessions had more than two active compounds, but the compounds greatly differed between the two genera. On the basis of similarities in whether active compounds were presence or absence, their amount and their composition ratio, we divided the <i>Brassica</i> accessions into three to five groups by cluster analyses. Most groups were composed of a mixture of allogamous and autogamous species sharing same genome, indicating that the variation depended on genome, not species. These results suggest that all species require pollinator visits for reproduction, despite their different reproductive systems. However, the inter-genus and intra-specific variations shown by the multiple groups within a species might cause different visitation frequencies by pollinators between genera and among accessions within a species, resulting in insufficient seed production in some accessions or species.

Journal

  • Breeding Science

    Breeding Science 62(4), 293-302, 2012-12-01

    Japanese Society of Breeding

References:  26

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    10031131497
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA11353132
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    ART
  • ISSN
    13447610
  • NDL Article ID
    024151187
  • NDL Call No.
    Z54-J372
  • Data Source
    CJP  NDL  IR  J-STAGE 
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