Within- and Between-Individual Variation in Energy and Nutrient Intake in Japanese Adults : Effect of Age and Sex Differences on Group Size and Number of Records Required for Adequate Dietary Assessment

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Author(s)

    • FUKUMOTO Azusa
    • Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo
    • ASAKURA Keiko
    • Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine
    • MURAKAMI Kentaro
    • Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, School of Public Health, the University of Tokyo
    • SASAKI Satoshi
    • Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, School of Public Health, the University of Tokyo
    • OKUBO Hitomi
    • Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, the University of Tokyo
    • HIROTA Naoko
    • Department of Health and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Human Health Science, Matsumoto University
    • NOTSU Akiko
    • Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Tottori College
    • TODORIKI Hidemi
    • Department of Public Health and Hygiene, School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus
    • MIURA Ayako
    • Department of Health and Nutritional Science, Faculty of Health Promotional Science, Hamamatsu University
    • FUKUI Mitsuru
    • Department of Statistics, Osaka City University Medical School
    • DATE Chigusa
    • Department of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Human Science and Environment, University of Hyogo

Abstract

<b>Background: </b>Information on within- and between-individual variation in energy and nutrient intake is critical for precisely estimating usual dietary intake; however, data from Japanese populations are limited.<BR><b>Methods: </b>We used dietary records to examine within- and between-individual variation by age and sex in the intake of energy and 31 selected nutrients among Japanese adults. We also calculated the group size required to estimate mean intake for a group and number of days required both to rank individuals within a group and to assess an individual’s usual intake, all with appropriate arbitrary precision. A group of Japanese women (younger: 30–49 years, <i>n</i> = 58; older: 50–69 years, <i>n</i> = 63) and men (younger: 30–49 years, <i>n</i> = 54; older: 50–76 years, <i>n</i> = 67) completed dietary records for 4 nonconsecutive days in each season (16 days in total).<BR><b>Results: </b>Coefficients of within-individual variation and between-individual variation were generally larger in the younger group than in the older group and in men as compared with women. The group size required to estimate a group’s mean intake, and number of days required to assess an individual’s usual intake, were generally larger for the younger group and for men. In general, a longer period was required to rank women and older adults.<BR><b>Conclusions: </b>In a group of Japanese adults, coefficients of within-individual variation and between-individual variation, which were used to estimate the group size and number of records required for adequate dietary assessment, differed by age, sex, and nutrient.

Journal

  • Journal of Epidemiology

    Journal of Epidemiology 23(3), 178-186, 2013-05-01

    Japan Epidemiological Association

References:  29

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    10031167776
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10952696
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    ART
  • ISSN
    09175040
  • Data Source
    CJP  J-STAGE 
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