Approach to novel functional foods for stress control: 4. Regulation of serotonin transporter by food factors

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Author(s)

    • Ito Mikiko
    • 徳島大学医学部 Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School|Project team of the 21st century COE program “Human Nutritional Science on Stress Control”, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Haito Sakiko
    • 徳島大学医学部 Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Furumoto Mari
    • 徳島大学医学部 Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Kawai Yoshichika
    • Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School|Project team of the 21st century COE program “Human Nutritional Science on Stress Control”, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Terao Junji
    • Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School|Project team of the 21st century COE program “Human Nutritional Science on Stress Control”, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Miyamoto Ken-ichi
    • Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School|Project team of the 21st century COE program “Human Nutritional Science on Stress Control”, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School

Abstract

Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are pre-synaptic proteins specialized for the clearance of serotonin following vesicular release at central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system synapses. SERTs are high affinity targets in vivo for antidepressants such as serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). These include 'medical' psychopharmacological agents such as analgesics and antihistamines, a plant extract called St John's Wort (Hypericum) . Osteoclasts are the primary cells responsible for bone resorption. They arise by the differentiation of osteoclast precursors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. The expression of SERTs was increased in RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells. Using RANKL stimulation of RAW264.7 cells as a model system for osteoclast differentiation, we studied the direct effects of food factor on serotonin uptake. The SSRIs (fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) inhibited markedly (~95%) in serotonin transport in differentiated osteoclast cells. The major components of St. John's Wort, hyperforin and hypericine were significantly decreased in serotonin transport activity. Thus, a new in vitro model using RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells may be useful to analyze the regulation of SERT by food factors and SSRIs.

Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are pre-synaptic proteins specialized for the clearance of serotonin following vesicular release at central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system synapses. SERTs are high affinity targets <I>in vivo</I> for antidepressants such as serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). These include ‘medical’ psychopharmacological agents such as analgesics and antihistamines, a plant extract called St John’s Wort (Hypericum). Osteoclasts are the primary cells responsible for bone resorption. They arise by the differentiation of osteoclast precursors of the monocyte/macrophage lineage. The expression of SERTs was increased in RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells. Using RANKL stimulation of RAW264.7 cells as a model system for osteoclast differentiation, we studied the direct effects of food factor on serotonin uptake. The SSRIs (fluoxetine and fluvoxamine) inhibited markedly (-95%) in serotonin transport in differentiated osteoclast cells. The major components of St. John’s Wort, hyperforin and hypericine were significantly decreased in serotonin transport activity. Thus, a new <I>in vitro</I> model using RANKL-induced osteoclast-like cells may be useful to analyze the regulation of SERT by food factors and SSRIs. J. Med. Invest. 52 Suppl.: 245-248, November, 2005

Journal

  • The Journal of Medical Investigation

    The Journal of Medical Investigation 52(Supplement), 245-248, 2005

    Faculty of Medicine Tokushima University

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    110002276828
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA11166929
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    journal article
  • ISSN
    1343-1420
  • Data Source
    NII-ELS  IR  J-STAGE 
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