In Vivo Effect of Fluoride-substituted Apatite on Rat Bone

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Author(s)

    • INOUE Miho
    • Department of Oral Pathology and Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University
    • NAGATSUKA Hitoshi
    • Department of Oral Pathology and Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University
    • TSUJIGIWA Hidetsugu
    • Department of Oral Pathology and Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University
    • INOUE Masahisa
    • Laboratories for Structure and Function Research, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University
    • LEGEROS Racquel Z.
    • Department of Biomaterials & Biomimetics, New York University College of Dentistry
    • YAMAMOTO Toshio
    • Department of Oral Morphology, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University
    • NAGAI Noriyuki
    • Department of Oral Pathology and Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University

Abstract

Different types of calcium phosphate compounds are commercially available for medical and dental applications as bone substitute materials. Biological apatites contain several kinds of minor elements such as carbonate (CO<sub>3</sub>), magnesium (Mg), and fluoride (F) in enamel, dentin, and bone. It has been shown that F ion and F-substituted apatite promoted osteoblast proliferation and inhibited osteoclast cell activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the <i>in vivo</i> rat tibia activity on F-substituted apatite (FAp). Apatites of unsintered calcium deficient apatite (CDA), and FAps, with low, medium, and high F concentrations, were implanted in rat tibia for 1 and 2 weeks. Implanted tissues were embedded in paraffin blocks, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and histomorphometrically observed. Results showed that low F concentration induced better and faster new bone formation <i>in vivo</i> compared to CDA. Therefore the results suggested that F as a minor element in bone rendered a suitable effect on bone formation <i>in vivo</i>.

Journal

  • Dental Materials Journal

    Dental Materials Journal 24(3), 398-402, 2005-09-01

    The Japanese Society for Dental Materials and Devices

References:  33

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    110002983732
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10443149
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    ART
  • ISSN
    02874547
  • Data Source
    CJP  NII-ELS  J-STAGE  NDL-Digital 
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