Burnout Among Nurses in Outpatient Departments : Relationship between Burnout Syndrome and Situational Factors Among Nurses

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Author(s)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between Burnout Syndrome and situational factors among nurses in outpatient departments. A self-reporting questionnaire was used to survey 1770 nursing staff members from general hospitals with 150 beds or more in the Kinki area of Japan. The scale used to measure degree of burnout was the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI; Maslach & Jackson, 1981), translated and revised for person-helping professionals in Japan (Tao et al., 1996). The situational factors assumed to contribute to Burnout Syndrome among nurses are personal attributes of nurses, work environment, content of service in the outpatient department, and support sources. Statistical analysis of the questionnaire data yielded the following results: (1) nurses who are young and have little years of nursing experience showed a greater tendency to suffer burnout; (2) The stage when nurses request a change to other positions is important for the prevention of position transfers and resignation from nursing in outpatient departments; (3) facilitation of liaison with nurses in outpatient departments and other professionals and improvement in the support network at their workplace must be promoted to increase nurses' motivation to continue working and to reduce burnout; (4) especially for young nurses with little outpatient experience, it is essential to promote support from their superior, their colleagues in the workplace and other medical professionals. These findings suggest that improvements in nursing management, outpatient nursing, continuing nursing education, and efforts to enhance the mental health of nurses in outpatient departments are crucial for the prevention of burnout among such nurses.

Journal

  • Bulletin of health sciences Kobe

    Bulletin of health sciences Kobe 21, 47-56, 2006-03-30

    Kobe University

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    110005859384
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA11316362
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    13468707
  • Data Source
    NII-ELS 
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