Effects of Lifestyle on Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene Concentration

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Author(s)

    • Kim Heon
    • Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Chunbuk National University
    • Oyama Tsunehiro
    • Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health
    • Isse Toyohi
    • Department of Environmental Health, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health
    • Matsuno Koji
    • Bio-information Research Center, University of Occupational and Environmental Health
    • Katoh Takahiko
    • Department of Public Health, Miyazaki University School of Medicine
    • Uchiyama Iwao
    • Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University

Abstract

This study aimed to clarify the variation of urinary excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene, which is a major metabolite of pyrene, in relation to lifestyle, including factors such as diet and smoking. The study subjects were 251 workers (male: 196, female: 55, mean age: 44.3) who were not occupationally exposed to PAHs. Urine specimens were collected from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. and their 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations were determined by HPLC. A questionnaire was distributed in order to learn gross aspects of the subjects' lifestyles, i.e., smoking, alcohol consumption, coffee/black tea intake, and dietary habits. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that cigarette consumption most strongly affected the 1-hydroxypyrene level in urine, followed by dietary balance. The urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations of smokers were about 2 times higher than those of non-smokers. Subjects who ate more meat and/or fish excreted 1.5-2 times more 1-hydroxypyrene in urine than those who ate more vegetables.<br>

Journal

  • Journal of Occupational Health

    Journal of Occupational Health 49(3), 183-189, 2007

    Japan Society for Occupational Health

Cited by:  1

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    110006278712
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA11090645
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    Journal Article
  • ISSN
    1341-9145
  • NDL Article ID
    8752453
  • NDL Source Classification
    ZS17(科学技術--医学--衛生学・公衆衛生)
  • NDL Call No.
    Z54-J76
  • Data Source
    CJPref  NDL  NII-ELS  J-STAGE 
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