Effective Suppression of Bystander Effects by DMSO Treatment of Irradiated CHO Cells

Author(s)

    • Suzuki Keiji [他] SUZUKI Keiji
    • Division of Radiation Biology, Department of Radiology and Radiation Biology, Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University
    • MATSUDA Naoki
    • Division of Radiation Biology and Protection, Center for Frontier Life Sciences, Nagasaki University
    • KODAMA Seiji
    • Radiation Biology Laboratory, Radiation Research Center, Frontier Science Innovation Center, Organization for University-Industry-Government Cooperation, Osaka Prefecture University
    • SUZUKI Minoru
    • Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University
    • NAGATA Kenji
    • Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University
    • KINASHI Yuko
    • Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University
    • MASUNAGA Shin-Ichiro
    • Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University
    • ONO Koji
    • Particle Radiation Oncology Research Center, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University
    • WATANABE Masami
    • Laboratory of Radiation Biology, Division of Radiation Life Science, Department of Radiation Life Science and Radiation Medical Science, Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

Abstract

Evidence is accumulating that irradiated cells produce some signals which interact with non-exposed cells in the same population via a bystander effect. Here, we examined whether DMSO is effective in suppressing radiation induced bystander effects in CHO and repair deficient xrs5 cells. When 1 Gy-irradiated CHO cells were treated with 0.5% DMSO for 1 hr before irradiation, the induction of micronuclei in irradiated cells was suppressed to 80% of that in non-treated irradiated cells. The suppressive effect of DMSO on the formation of bystander signals was examined and the results demonstrated that 0.5% DMSO treatment of irradiated cells completely suppressed the induction of micronuclei by the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells. It is suggested that irradiated cells ceased signal formation for bystander effects by the action of DMSO. To determine the involvement of reactive oxygen species on the formation of bystander signals, we examined oxidative stress levels using the DCFH staining method in irradiated populations. The results showed that the treatment of irradiated cells with 0.5% DMSO did not suppress oxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the prevention of oxidative stress is independent of the suppressive effect of DMSO on the formation of the bystander signal in irradiated cells. It is suggested that increased ROS in irradiated cells is not a substantial trigger of a bystander signal.<br>

Journal

  • Journal of Radiation Research

    Journal of Radiation Research 48(4), 327-333, 2007-07-01

    Journal of Radiation Research Editorial Committee

References:  27

Cited by:  3

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    110006343945
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA00705792
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    Journal Article
  • ISSN
    04493060
  • NDL Article ID
    8811760
  • NDL Source Classification
    ZS45(科学技術--医学--放射線医学)
  • NDL Call No.
    Z53-P232
  • Data Source
    CJP  CJPref  NDL  NII-ELS  IR  J-STAGE  NDL-Digital 
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