Howard overing sturgis のTimとBelchamberにおけるアセクシュアリティ  [in Japanese] Asexuality in Howard overing Sturgis's Tim and Belchamber  [in Japanese]

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Abstract

This paper argues that asexuality of the protagonists is the crucial element that drives Howard Overing Sturgis's novels, Tim (1891) and Belchamber (1904). The heroes and heroines in the late nineteenth century cannot deviate from the role models that "compulsory heterosexuality" imposes upon them. Sturgis's protagonists do not seemingly belong to the figure. However, they must develop their character under the pressure of the compulsory heterosexuality. Their asexuality does not provide them with other choices, which causes their tragedy. Tim, the protagonist of Tim, is a boy who loves only nature and has just expected that "the tender gracious figure" would come to him. He does not know what he is and has no erotic desire for anybody. However, two triangular relationships drive him to the awareness of gender and sexuality. The relationship with his father and his friend Carol makes him realize that he is not like other boys. The relationship with Carol and his girlfriend Violet reminds him of marriage, which in turn makes him realize that his love for Carol is similar to Jonathan's love for David in the First Book of Samuel: Tim's love for Carol is homoerotic. In other words, the compulsory heterosexuality drives asexual Tim to become a hero who dies when he confesses his homoerotic desire. Sainty, the protagonist of Belchamber, is a boy who loves embroidery. In his triangular relationship with his mother and his younger brother, whom the role of the hero of the story and the heir to Belchamber befits, Sainty becomes aware that he is "effeminate" and "not manly." Accordingly, he starts to take on the role of a mother. However, another triangular relationship with his vicious cousin and a pretty girl forces him to think about marriage with the girl. Also in Belchamber, compulsory heterosexuality dominates the life of the protagonist. Sainty's asexuality deprives him of other choices of living for him. Sturgis's works do not seem to have been properly assessed. According to the discussion on the process that the main characters are forced towards "the heroes," protagonists' asexuality makes the true value of the works invisible.

This paper argues that asexuality of the protagonists is the crucial element that drives Howard Overing Sturgis's novels, Tim (1891) and Belchamber (1904). The heroes and heroines in the late nineteenth century cannot deviate from the role models that "compulsory heterosexuality" imposes upon them. Sturgis's protagonists do not seemingly belong to the figure. However, they must develop their character under the pressure of the compulsory heterosexuality. Their asexuality does not provide them with other choices, which causes their tragedy. Tim, the protagonist of Tim, is a boy who loves only nature and has just expected that "the tender gracious figure" would come to him. He does not know what he is and has no erotic desire for anybody. However, two triangular relationships drive him to the awareness of gender and sexuality. The relationship with his father and his friend Carol makes him realize that he is not like other boys. The relationship with Carol and his girlfriend Violet reminds him of marriage, which in turn makes him realize that his love for Carol is similar to Jonathan's love for David in the First Book of Samuel: Tim's love for Carol is homoerotic. In other words, the compulsory heterosexuality drives asexual Tim to become a hero who dies when he confesses his homoerotic desire. Sainty, the protagonist of Belchamber, is a boy who loves embroidery. In his triangular relationship with his mother and his younger brother, whom the role of the hero of the story and the heir to Belchamber befits, Sainty becomes aware that he is "effeminate" and "not manly." Accordingly, he starts to take on the role of a mother. However, another triangular relationship with his vicious cousin and a pretty girl forces him to think about marriage with the girl. Also in Belchamber, compulsory heterosexuality dominates the life of the protagonist. Sainty's asexuality deprives him of other choices of living for him. Sturgis's works do not seem to have been properly assessed. According to the discussion on the process that the main characters are forced towards "the heroes," protagonists' asexuality makes the true value of the works invisible.

Journal

  • Essays and studies

    Essays and studies 58(1), 115-138, 2007-09

    Tokyo Woman's Christian University

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    110007172162
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AN00161550
  • Text Lang
    JPN
  • Article Type
    Departmental Bulletin Paper
  • Journal Type
    大学紀要
  • ISSN
    04934350
  • NDL Article ID
    8961890
  • NDL Source Classification
    ZV1(一般学術誌--一般学術誌・大学紀要)
  • NDL Call No.
    Z22-401
  • Data Source
    NDL  NII-ELS  IR 
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