Becoming Stateless: Historical Experience and Its Reflection on the Concept of State among the Lahu in Yunnan and Mainland Southeast Asian Massif

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著者

    • 片岡 樹 Kataoka Tatsuki
    • 京都大学大学院アジア・アフリカ地域研究研究科 Graduate School of Asian and African Area Studies, Kyoto University

抄録

This paper aims to contribute to James Scott's discussion of statelessness in "Zomia" by examining the realities of political autonomy and the concepts of state and kingship of the Lahu. During the nineteenth century, "kings" appeared among the Lahu in parts of southwest Yunnan. Indeed, the Lahu enjoyed political autonomy under their own kings before these were eliminated in the process of modern state formation and border demarcation in China and Burma. Messianic movements emerged among the Lahu after they became stateless. These movements stressed the need to redeem the lost states and kings throughout the course of the Lahu's modern history. In this respect, statelessness is not a timeless, quintessential attribute of the Lahu. Rather, they only became conscious of statelessness during the modern period. What this demonstrates is that the Lahu have never been conscious anarchists who chose to avoid kings and states. They possess their own original concepts of state and kingship, even though these differ from our conventional understanding, and the main theme of their historical experience and mythical accounts centers around their search for their own state and king.

収録刊行物

  • Southeast Asian Studies

    Southeast Asian Studies 2(1), 69-94, 2013

    京都大学 東南アジア地域研究研究所

各種コード

  • NII論文ID(NAID)
    110009558112
  • NII書誌ID(NCID)
    AA1256533X
  • 本文言語コード
    ENG
  • 雑誌種別
    大学紀要
  • ISSN
    2186-7275
  • NDL 記事登録ID
    024431899
  • NDL 請求記号
    Z76-A768
  • データ提供元
    NDL  NII-ELS  J-STAGE 
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