Multi-Faceted Self, Social Constructivist Context, and Communication Practice to Promote Learner Autonomy

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Abstract

This study examined the practicability of using a social constructivist EFL context, e.g., taking a critical stance to deal with topics and issues deriving from real world-concerned, self-in-society-involved sociocultural circumstances (e.g., Dornyei & Ushioda, 2009), while focusing on developing self-identity (e.g., establishing personal beliefs, sense of values, and philosophy of life) and self-orienting (e.g., creating academic and professional goals) in real life contexts. It also explored the interrelatedness between the employed EFL context, related teaching methods, communication practice, and conventional EFL learning styles heavily anchored in rote practice. Japanese college students at a national university (N=241) participated in the study by taking a one semester-long core English course, which aimed to develop self-identity while engaging in self-orienting in an EFL context. Considering learner autonomy (e.g., self-directed and responsible target language use through metacognidve acts: Benson, 2001), the focus was on developing a multifaceted self to exemplify each learner's raison d'etre. The results indicated that the provided social constructivist context can be practical in promoting learner autonomy. In path analysis, the best-fitting model indicated that engaging identity formation together with multiliteracies-mediated communication practice directly affected learner autonomy, while test-oriented rote learning behavior showed little effect on learner autonomy.

Journal

  • Jacet journal

    Jacet journal (59), 53-73, 2015

    Japan Association of College English Teachers

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    110009907978
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA12208671
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0285-8673
  • NDL Article ID
    026089213
  • NDL Call No.
    Z7-533
  • Data Source
    NDL  NII-ELS  NDL-Digital 
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