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Abstract

SummaryBackgroundThe associations between alcohol consumption and sleep-disordered breathing in women are uncertain.MethodsWe conducted a cross-sectional study of 3113 women aged 30–69 years. The 3% oxygen desaturation index (3%ODI), based on overnight pulse oximetry findings, was selected as an indicator of sleep-disordered breathing.Results3%ODI frequencies of ≥5 were higher for drinking women with ethanol intakes of ≥23.0 g/d than for never drinkers: the respective multivariable odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals was 1.8(1.0–3.4). The corresponding odds ratio was 3.0(1.6–5.8) for habitual snoring. The associations of ethanol intakes of ≥23.0 g/d with 3%ODI ≥ 5 was more evident among women with BMI <23.0 kg/m2 (median) than those with higher BMI but did not vary by habitual snoring. The multivariable odds ratios of 3%ODI ≥ 5 for women with ethanol intakes of ≥23.0 g/d versus never drinkers were 2.7(1.0–6.7) for lower BMI and 1.5(0.6–3.3) for higher BMI and the corresponding odds ratio were 2.8(1.6–7.2) and 3.2(1.3–7.9) for habitual snoring, respectively.ConclusionAlcohol consumption was associated with higher prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing among Japanese women.

Journal

  • Respiratory medicine

    Respiratory medicine 105(5), 796-800, 2011-05

    Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    120003103891
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10699492
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    journal article
  • ISSN
    0954-6111
  • Data Source
    IR 
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