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Abstract

Negatively charged low-density lipoprotein (LDL), generated via multiple processes such as oxidation, acetylation, or glycosylation, plays a key role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and related diseases. Anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (AE-HPLC) can subfractionate LDL into LDL-1, LDL-2, and LDL-3 based on LDL particle charge, but the clinical significance of LDL subfractions has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of these fractions with particular regard to atherogenic risk in hypertensive patients. Ninety-eight patients with essential hypertension (age 67.0±10.7years; 54 males) were enrolled in the present study. The relationships between LDL subfractions and atherogenic risk factors, including lipid profiles, blood pressure and plasma 8-isoprostane as a marker of oxidative stress, were examined. LDL-1 levels were significantly and negatively correlated with body mass index (r=-0.384, p<0.001), systolic blood pressure (r=-0.457, p<0.001), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (r=-0.457, p<0.001) and 8-isoprostane levels (r=-0.415, p<0.001). LDL-3, which is the most negatively charged fraction of total LDL, was significantly and positively correlated with these parameters (r=0.267, 0.481, 0.357, and 0.337, respectively). LDL-1 levels were significantly lower (p<0.001), and LDL-2 and LDL-3 levels were significantly higher (each p<0.001) in patients with poorly controlled hypertension than in patients with well-controlled hypertension. In addition, an increase in the total number of traditional risk factors at time of study participation, but not previous diagnosis, was associated with a decrease in LDL-1 levels and increases in LDL-2 and LDL-3 levels. These data suggest that LDL subfractions are associated with multiple atherogenic risk factors and that treatment to modify these risk factors could result in Negatively charged low-density lipoprotein (LDL), generated via multiple processes such as oxidation, acetylation, or glycosylation, plays a key role in the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis and related diseases. Anion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (AE-HPLC) can subfractionate LDL into LDL-1, LDL-2, and LDL-3 based on LDL particle charge, but the clinical significance of LDL subfractions has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of these fractions with particular regard to atherogenic risk in hypertensive patients. Ninety-eight patients with essential hypertension (age 67.0 ± 10.7 years; 54 males) were enrolled in the present study. The relationships between LDL subfractions and atherogenic risk factors, including lipid profiles, blood pressure and plasma 8-isoprostane as a marker of oxidative stress, were examined. LDL-1 levels were significantly and negatively correlated with body mass index (r = −0.384, p < 0.001), systolic blood pressure (r = −0.457, p < 0.001), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (r = −0.457, p < 0.001) and 8-isoprostane levels (r = −0.415, p < 0.001). LDL-3, which is the most negatively charged fraction of total LDL, was significantly and positively correlated with these parameters (r = 0.267, 0.481, 0.357, and 0.337, respectively). LDL-1 levels were significantly lower (p < 0.001), and LDL-2 and LDL-3 levels were significantly higher (each p < 0.001) in patients with poorly controlled hypertension than in patients with well-controlled hypertension. In addition, an increase in the total number of traditional risk factors at time of study participation, but not previous diagnosis, was associated with a decrease in LDL-1 levels and increases in LDL-2 and LDL-3 levels. These data suggest that LDL subfractions are associated with multiple atherogenic risk factors and that treatment to modify these risk factors could result in changes in LDL subfraction levels. In conclusion, LDL subfractions isolated by AE-HPLC may represent a marker of atherogenic risk in patients with hypertension.

Journal

  • Heart and Vessels

    Heart and Vessels 27(3), 235-242, 2012-05

    Springer Japan

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    120004702413
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    journal article
  • ISSN
    0910-8327
  • Data Source
    IR 
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