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Abstract

im: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of vegetable juice on depression and anxiety scores in slightly depressed individuals.Methods: Sixty-six research participants were randomized to 3 groups: group A, plain vegetable juice; group B, vitamin-fortified vegetable and fruit juice; group C, control. Vegetable juices were administered for 12 weeks. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventories (STAI) 1 and 2 were administered 4 times and a blood sample was also obtained from each participant for measurements of folic acid, magnesium, and beta-carotene.Results: A significant decrease in depression and anxiety was found in groups A and B at 12 weeks. In group A, 70% of the participants yielded a decrease of 3 or more points for the BDI and STAI-2 scores, and 80% of them did so for the STAI-1 score. In group B, 50% of the participants yielded a decrease of 3 or more points for the BDI and STAI-1 scores, and 70% of them did so for the STAI-2 score. Among the blood nutrients studied, an inverse linear correlation was found between the BDI score and blood beta-carotene level (Pearson r = -0.587; P < .01). The STAI-1 score and blood beta-carotene level were also inversely correlated (Pearson r = -0.560; P < .05).Conclusion: Our findings suggest that vegetable juice intake may be associated with improvement of depression and anxiety in slightly depressed individuals.

Journal

  • Journal of Family Medicine & Community Health

    Journal of Family Medicine & Community Health 2(2), 1030, 2015-03

    JSciMed Central

Keywords

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    120005575432
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    journal article
  • Data Source
    IR 
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