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Abstract

Stem cell maintenance is established by neighboring niche cells that promote stem cell self-renewal. However, it is poorly understood how stem cell activity is regulated by systemic, tissue-extrinsic signals in response to environmental cues and changes in physiological status. Here, we show that neuropeptide F (NPF) signaling plays an important role in the pathway regulating mating-induced germline stem cell (GSC) proliferation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. NPF expressed in enteroendocrine cells (EECs) of the midgut is released in response to the seminal-fluid protein sex peptide (SP) upon mating. This midgut-derived NPF controls mating-induced GSC proliferation via ovarian NPF receptor (NPFR) activity, which modulates bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling levels in GSCs. Our study provides a molecular mechanism that describes how a gut-derived systemic factor couples stem cell behavior to physiological status, such as mating, through interorgan communication.

Journal

  • PLoS biology

    PLoS biology 16(9), e2005004, 2018-09

    Public Library of Science

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    120006537236
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA11886145
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    journal article
  • ISSN
    1544-9173
  • Data Source
    IR 
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