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Abstract

We implemented and compared two 10-month health education programs in Minowa town and Matsumoto city, Nagano prefecture, Japan. The Matsumoto city cohort underwent a program of monthly classroom activities (CA group), whereas the Minowa town cohort were not only subjected to classroom activities but also performed 90-min strength and weight training once a week and were termed the classroom/training (CT) group. We measured anthropometric, blood pressure, physical fitness, blood chemistry, and brain function variables. All participants were provided pedometers and were encouraged to walk. Monthly seminars included education regarding yoga, exercise, blood pressure, nutrition, and other health-related topics. In total, 92 healthy participants were included in the CA group [age, 66.5 ± 5.4 years (mean ± standard error of mean); 30 males and 62 females] and 46 healthy participants were included in the CT group (mean age 62.7 ± 4.7 years; 22 males and 24 females). We observed significant differences between the average number of steps walked in the CA (7241.7 ± 113.6) and CT (8686.7 ± 167.2) groups. Both the groups both showed significant improvements in anthropometric, blood pressure, physical fitness, blood chemistry, and brain function tests; however, the CT group showed markedly greater improvement after the health education program than before participation. In conclusion, the CT program had added benefits over the CA program because of the higher average amount of walking (approximately 1,400 steps) and the inclusion of a weekly weight-training activity.

Journal

  • INNOVATIVE JOURNAL OF MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCE

    INNOVATIVE JOURNAL OF MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCE 5(4), 170-181, 2015-08

    IJMHS

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    120006651095
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    journal article
  • Data Source
    IR 
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