Wear Resistance of Magnetic Fe-Pt Alloy Teeth

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Author(s)

    • Ohkubo Chikahiro
    • Department of Removable Prosthodontics, Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine
    • Takeuchi Sae
    • Undergraduate student, Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine
    • Sato Yohei
    • Department of Removable Prosthodontics, Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine
    • Shimura Ichiro
    • Department of Removable Prosthodontics, Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine
    • Aoki Takayuki
    • Department of Removable Prosthodontics, Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine
    • Tanaka Yasuhiro
    • Department of Biomaterials, Nagasaki University Faculty of Dentistry
    • Watanabe Ikuya
    • Department of Biomaterials Science, Baylor College of Dentistry
    • Hosoi Toshio
    • Department of Removable Prosthodontics, Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine

Abstract

<B><I>Purpose</I></B>: Fe-Pt alloys have magnetic properties and can be cast using a dental casting machine. However, no studies have ever been conducted to examine the wear of Fe-Pt alloys. This study evaluated the in vitro wear resistance of magnetic Fe-Pt alloy teeth.<BR><B><I>Materials and Methods</I></B>: Maxillary and mandibular tooth patterns were duplicated from artificial first molars (Livdent FB30, GC, Japan) and cast from a custom-made Fe-Pt ingots (Fe-39.5 at % Pt-0.75 at % Nb) using a high-frequency centrifugal casting machine (Jelenko Eagle, Jelenko, NY, USA). The cast teeth were vacuum-enclosed in quartz-glass tubes, solution-treated at 1,325°C for 45 min., and then quenched in ice water. Subsequently, the teeth were aged at 600°C for 5 hours to acquire hard magnetic properties. As controls, Au-Ag-Pd alloy (Castwell MC, GC), Au-Pt alloy (PGA-3, Ishifuku, Japan) and Co-Cr alloy (Wisil, Austenal, Germany) were also prepared by conventional casting. The wear of the teeth (both maxillary and mandibular) was measured using an in vitro two-body wear testing apparatus that simulated chewing function (60 strokes/min., grinding distance: 2 mm under flowing water). Wear resistance was assessed as volume loss (mm<SUP>3</SUP>) at 49 N (grinding force) after 50,000 strokes. The results (n=5) were analyzed by ANOVA/Fisher's test (α=0.05).<BR><B><I>Results</I></B>: The wear resistance [Mean (SD)] of each alloy was: Au-Pt [0.55 (0.14)], Au-Ag-Pd [0.40 (0.05)], Fe-Pt [0.02 (0.03)], and Co-Cr [0.04 (0.01)]. Fe-Pt alloy had the least wear although there were no significant differences compared to Co-Cr alloy (p>0.05). The Au-Pt alloy had the worst wear resistance of all the metals tested (p<0.05).<BR><B><I>Conclusion</I></B>: Based on the results of this study, Fe-Pt alloy should wear very little when used for both maxillary and mandibular teeth.

Journal

  • Prosthodontic Research & Practice

    Prosthodontic Research & Practice 4(1), 42-47, 2005

    Japan Prosthodontic Society

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130000094019
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    1347-7021
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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