Gastroptosis is Associated with Less Dyspepsia, Rather than a Cause of Dyspepsia, in Japanese Persons

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Author(s)

    • Kusano Motoyasu
    • Department of Endoscopy and Endoscopic Surgery, Gunma University Hospital, Japan
    • Mizuide Masafumi
    • Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
    • Horikoshi Tsutomu
    • Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
    • Mori Masatomo
    • Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
    • Moki Fumitaka
    • Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
    • Hosaka Hiroko
    • Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
    • Shimoyama Yasuyuki
    • Department of Endoscopy and Endoscopic Surgery, Gunma University Hospital, Japan
    • Kawamura Osamu
    • Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
    • Nagoshi Atsuto
    • Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
    • Maeda Masaki
    • Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
    • Kuribayashi Shikou
    • Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
    • Zai Hiroaki
    • Department of Medicine and Molecular Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan

Abstract

<b>Objective</b> Gastroptosis is recognized by its characteristic appearance on barium studies. The present prospective study assessed the relationship between gastroptosis and dyspeptic symptoms.<br> <b>Methods</b> Japanese subjects underwent health screening, and gastroptosis was diagnosed by barium studies. Consecutive subjects (500 women and 167 men) with gastroptosis were identified and the same number of age-matched subjects without gastroptosis were selected as controls. Dyspepsia was classified as reflux-like (heartburn and belching), dysmotility-like (bloating and fullness), or ulcer-like dyspepsia (epigastralgia) based on the Rome II criteria.<br> <b>Results</b> Body mass index was significantly lower in women with gastroptosis than in controls [19.7±1.83 (SD) vs. 23.4±3.70, p<0.0001], and also in men (19.7±2.00 vs. 23.9±2.89, p<0.0001). The incidence of dyspepsia was significantly lower in women with gastroptosis than in controls (56/500 vs. 87/500, p<0.01) and also in men (10/167 vs. 25/167, p<0.05), especially in women with ulcer-like dyspepsia (15/500 vs. 32/500, p<0.05) and in men with reflux-like dyspepsia (2/167 vs. 12/167, p<0.05). By logistic regression analysis, gastroptosis was associated with a lower risk of dyspepsia (odds ratio: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.405-0.941, p=0.025) and ulcer-like dyspepsia (odds ratio: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.177-0.726, p=0.004) in women.<br> <b>Conclusion</b> Dyspeptic symptoms were significantly less common in subjects with gastroptosis. Accordingly, gastroptosis may protect against dyspeptic symptoms, rather than causing functional dyspepsia.<br>

Journal

  • Internal Medicine

    Internal Medicine 50(7), 667-671, 2011

    The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine

Cited by:  1

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