Diversity of Fimbrillin among <i>Porphyromonas gulae</i> Clinical Isolates from Japanese Dogs

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Author(s)

    • NOMURA Ryota NOMURA Ryota
    • Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Suita, Osaka 565–0871, Japan
    • ASAI Fumitoshi
    • Department of Pharmacology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252–5201, Japan
    • SHIRAI Mitsuyuki
    • Department of Pharmacology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252–5201, Japan
    • KATO Yukio
    • Department of Veterinary Public Health II, School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252–5201, Japan
    • MURAKAMI Masaru
    • Department of Molecular Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252–5201, Japan
    • NAKANO Kazuhiko
    • Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Suita, Osaka 565–0871, Japan
    • HIRAI Norihiko
    • Department of Pharmacology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252–5201, Japan
    • MIZUSAWA Tetsuya
    • Department of Veterinary Public Health II, School of Veterinary Medicine, Azabu University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252–5201, Japan
    • NAKA Shuhei
    • Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Suita, Osaka 565–0871, Japan
    • YAMASAKI Yoshie
    • Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Suita, Osaka 565–0871, Japan|Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama 700–8556, Japan

Abstract

<i>Porphyromonas gulae</i>, a gram-negative black-pigmented anaerobe, is a pathogen for periodontitis in dogs. An approximately 41-kDa fimbrial subunit protein (FimA) encoded by <i>fimA</i> is regarded as associated with periodontitis. In the present study, the <i>fimA</i> genes of 17 <i>P. gulae</i> strains were sequenced, and classified into two major types. The generation of phylogenetic trees based on the deduced amino acid sequence of FimA of <i>P. gulae</i> strains along with sequences from several strains of <i>Porphyromonas gingivalis,</i> a major cause of human periodontitis, revealed that the two types of FimA (types A and B) of <i>P. gulae</i> were similar to type I FimA and types II and III FimA of <i>P. gingivalis</i>, respectively. A PCR system for classification was established based on differences in the nucleotide sequences of the <i>fimA</i> genes. Analysis of 115 <i>P. gulae</i>-positive oral swab specimens from dogs revealed that 42.6%, 22.6%, and 26.1% of them contained type A, type B, and both type A and B <i>fimA</i> genes, respectively. Experiments with a mouse abscess model demonstrated that the strains with type B <i>fimA</i> caused significantly greater systemic inflammation than those with type A. These results suggest that the FimA proteins of <i>P. gulae</i> are diverse with two major types and that strains with type B <i>fimA</i> could be more virulent.

Journal

  • Journal of Veterinary Medical Science

    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 74(7), 885-891, 2012

    JAPANESE SOCIETY OF VETERINARY SCIENCE

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130001879785
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10796138
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0916-7250
  • NDL Article ID
    023910787
  • NDL Call No.
    Z18-350
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
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