<i>Ehrlichia canis</i> Infection in Two Dogs that Emigrated from Endemic Areas

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Author(s)

    • BABA Kenji BABA Kenji
    • Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan
    • ITAMOTO Kazuhito ITAMOTO Kazuhito
    • Laboratory of Veterinary Clinical Diagnostics, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan
    • KITAGAWA Kozue
    • Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan
    • HIRAOKA Hiroko
    • Laboratory of Veterinary Clinical Pathology Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan
    • MIZUNO Takuya
    • Laboratory of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan
    • SATO Hiroshi
    • Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan
    • OKUDA Masaru
    • Laboratory of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Agriculture, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan

Abstract

Two dogs, emigrated from Zambia and China to Japan, were diagnosed with <i>Ehrlichia canis</i> infection. Both cases had thrombocytopenia, non-regenerative anemia, and hypergloblinemia with polyclonal gammopathy. Case 1 had ataxia of the hind limbs. Severe meningitis was revealed by magnetic resonance imaging examination. Intracytoplasmic inclusions were observed in mononuclear cells of cerebrospinal fluid. Case 2 had a history of bilateral epistaxis, and severe pancytopenia was noticed in complete blood count. Diagnosis was finally achieved by nested polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis. Thus, even in non-endemic areas, <i>E. canis</i> infection should be included in the differential diagnosis of clinically ill dogs that emigrated from endemic areas.

Journal

  • Journal of Veterinary Medical Science

    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 74(6), 775-778, 2012

    JAPANESE SOCIETY OF VETERINARY SCIENCE

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130002090067
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10796138
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0916-7250
  • NDL Article ID
    023864439
  • NDL Call No.
    Z18-350
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
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