Association of Mechanical Ventilation and Flue Use in Heaters With Asthma Symptoms in Japanese Schoolchildren: A Cross-Sectional Study in Sapporo, Japan

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Author(s)

    • Cong Shi
    • Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences
    • Araki Atsuko
    • Hokkaido University Center for Environmental and Health Sciences
    • Ukawa Shigekazu
    • Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences
    • Ait Bamai Yu
    • Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences
    • Tajima Shuji
    • Hokkaido University Center for Environmental and Health Sciences
    • Kanazawa Ayako
    • Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences
    • Yuasa Motoyuki
    • Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences
    • Tamakoshi Akiko
    • Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Public Health Sciences
    • Kishi Reiko
    • Hokkaido University Center for Environmental and Health Sciences

Abstract

<b>Background: </b>Use of fuel heaters is associated with childhood asthma. However, no studies have evaluated the associations of flue use and mechanical ventilation (ventilation) with asthma symptoms in schoolchildren.<BR><b>Methods: </b>This cross-sectional study investigated schoolchildren in grades 1 through 6 (age 6–12 years) in Sapporo, Japan. From November 2008 through January 2009, parents completed questionnaires regarding their home environment and their children’s asthma symptoms.<BR><b>Results: </b>In total, 4445 (69.5%) parents of 6393 children returned the questionnaire. After excluding incomplete responses, data on 3874 children (60.6%) were analyzed. The prevalence of current asthma symptoms and ever asthma symptoms were 12.8% and 30.9%, respectively. As compared with electric heaters, current asthma symptoms was associated with use of flued heaters without ventilation (OR = 1.62; 95% CI, 1.03–2.64) and unflued heaters with ventilation (OR = 1.77; 95% CI, 1.09–2.95) or without ventilation (OR = 2.23; 95% CI, 1.31–3.85). Regardless of dampness, unflued heaters were significantly associated with current asthma symptoms in the presence and absence of ventilation.<BR><b>Conclusions: </b>Use of unflued heaters was associated with current asthma symptoms, regardless of dampness. In particular, the prevalence of current asthma symptoms was higher in the absence of ventilation than in the presence of ventilation. Ever asthma symptoms was only associated with use of unflued heaters without ventilation. Consequently, use of fuel heaters, especially those that have no flue or ventilation, deserves attention, as their use might be associated with childhood asthma symptoms.

Journal

  • Journal of Epidemiology

    Journal of Epidemiology 24(3), 230-238, 2014

    Japan Epidemiological Association

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130003392103
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    journal article
  • ISSN
    0917-5040
  • Data Source
    IR  J-STAGE 
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