Are Octogenarians in Good Condition after Cardiac Valvular Surgery?

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Author(s)

    • Sumi Mizuki
    • Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan
    • Ariyoshi Tsuneo
    • Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan
    • Miura Takashi
    • Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan
    • Hashimoto Wataru
    • Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan
    • Hashizume Koji
    • Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan
    • Matsukuma Seiji
    • Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan
    • Eishi Kiyoyuki
    • Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Nagasaki, Japan

Abstract

Purpose: With the aging of society in developed countries and advances in surgical technology in recent years, surgery is increasing in elderly patients. When performing surgery in older patients, both surgical outcomes and the maintenance of postoperative quality of life (QOL) are important issues. This study investigated surgical outcomes and postoperative QOL in octogenarians who underwent cardiac valvular surgery.Methods and Results: Fifty-nine (16 males) octogenarians (80–89 years old, mean age, 82.4 ± 2.4 years) underwent cardiac valvular surgery between August 1999 and June 2011. A QOL questionnaire, which included the Barthel Index (BI), Fillenbaum Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (FIADL), and the Vitality Index (VI), was sent to all survivors. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess survival. Hospital mortality was 1.6% (1 patient). The 3-, 5-, and 7-year survival rates were 81.2%, 75.4%, and 67.8%, respectively. The BI showed that 87.5% of patients did not require caregiving, the FIADL showed that 32.5% were highly independent, and the VI showed that 87.5% were motivated to live.Conclusions: Short-term outcomes were satisfactory, with low complication and mortality rates. Mid-term outcomes showed maintenance of the minimal required ADL and good motivation for living. However, independence in social activities was decreased, suggesting the need for comprehensive social support.

Journal

  • Annals of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

    Annals of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery 20(6), 1021-1025, 2014

    The Editorial Committee of Annals of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery

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