Dynamin 2 Associates with Microtubules at Mitosis and Regulates Cell Cycle Progression

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Author(s)

    • Ishida Nobuhisa
    • Department of Neuroscience, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
    • Nakamura Yuichi
    • Department of Neuroscience, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
    • Tanabe Kenji
    • Department of Neuroscience, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
    • Li Shun-Ai
    • Department of Neuroscience, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
    • Takei Kohji
    • Department of Neuroscience, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Abstract

Dynamin, a ~100 kDa large GTPase, is known as a key player for membrane traffic. Recent evidence shows that dynamin also regulates the dynamic instability of microtubules by a mechanism independent of membrane traffic. As microtubules are highly dynamic during mitosis, we investigated whether the regulation of microtubules by dynamin is essential for cell cycle progression. Dynamin 2 intensely localized at the mitotic spindle, and the localization depended on its proline-rich domain (PRD), which is required for microtubule association. The deletion of PRD resulted in the impairment of cytokinesis, whereby the mutant had less effect on endocytosis. Interestingly, dominant-negative dynamin (K44A), which blocks membrane traffic but has no effect on microtubules, also blocked cytokinesis. On the other hand, the deletion of the middle domain, which binds to γ-tubulin, impaired the entry into mitosis. As both deletion mutants had no significant effect on endocytosis, dynamin 2 may participate in cell cycle progression by regulating the microtubules. These data suggest that dynamin may play a key role for cell cycle progression by two distinct pathways, membrane traffic and cytoskeleton.<br>

Journal

  • Cell Structure and Function

    Cell Structure and Function 36(2), 145-154, 2011

    Japan Society for Cell Biology

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130004137569
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0386-7196
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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