Higher Baseline LDL-C Levels Amplify the Short-Term Benefit of Early Intensive Statin Treatment in Acute Coronary Syndrome

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Author(s)

    • Dohi Tomotaka
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine.
    • Daida Hiroyuki
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine.
    • Miyauchi Katsumi
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine.
    • Okazaki Shinya
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine.
    • Yokoyama Takayuki
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine.
    • Tamura Hiroshi
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine.
    • Kojima Takahiko
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine.
    • Yokoyama Ken
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine.
    • Kurata Takeshi
    • Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Juntendo University School of Medicine.

Abstract

Aim: Some randomized studies have shown a delay of up to a few years in the statin-related survival advantage, whereas others have demonstrated an early survival benefit for some patients. We examined the short-term effects of statins in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), stratified according to baseline LDL-C.<BR>Methods: Patients with ACS (<i>n</i>=180) were randomized to receive 6 months of atorvastatin (20 mg) in the Extended-ESTABLISH trial. Six months after ACS onset, all patients were treated with statins to achieve an LDL-C value of < 100 mg/dL. Patient outcomes were analyzed with respect to LDL-C at the time of ACS onset: high baseline (≥100 mg/dL, <i>n</i>=124) or low baseline (< 100 mg/dL, <i>n</i>=56) LDL-C.<BR>Results: The cumulative incidence rates of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) did not significantly differ between the early-statin and control groups in the high baseline groups at 6 months (<i>p</i>=0.158), whereas a significant benefit of early intensive statins appeared 1 year (<i>p</i>=0.034) later. In contrast, we found no significant short-term benefits of statins after either 6 months or 1 year in the low baseline group. Multivariate analysis showed that early intensive atorvastatin therapy was associated with a lower risk of MACCE at 1 year in the high baseline group (OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.05 to 0.83; <i>p</i>=0.035).<BR>Conclusions: The effects of 6 months of intensive lipid-lowering therapy appear after 1 year in patients with ACS and baseline LDL-C ≥100 mg/dL.

Journal

  • Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis

    Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis 18(1), 42-48, 2011

    Japan Atherosclerosis Society

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130004444468
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    1340-3478
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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