Detection of <I>Mucor velutinosus</I> in a Blood Culture After Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation : A Pediatric Case Report

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Author(s)

    • Joichi Yumiko Joichi Yumiko
    • Section of Infection Diseases, Laboratory Division of Clinical Support, Hiroshima University Hospital|Division of Laboratory Medicine, Hiroshima University Hospital
    • Yarita Kyoko
    • Division of Clinical Research, Medical Mycology Research Center, Chiba University
    • Kamei Katsuhiko
    • Division of Clinical Research, Medical Mycology Research Center, Chiba University
    • Miki Mizuka
    • Department of Pediatrics, Hiroshima University Hospital
    • Onodera Makoto
    • Section of Infection Diseases, Laboratory Division of Clinical Support, Hiroshima University Hospital|Division of Laboratory Medicine, Hiroshima University Hospital
    • Harada Masako
    • Section of Infection Diseases, Laboratory Division of Clinical Support, Hiroshima University Hospital|Division of Laboratory Medicine, Hiroshima University Hospital

Abstract

Filamentous fungi were detected in the blood culture of a one-year-old boy after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. The patient was suspected to have aspergillosis and received micafungin. Fungi were isolated on potato dextrose agar medium and incubated at 37℃ for 2-5 days. Grayish, cottony colonies formed. A slide culture showed a spherical sporangium at the tips of the sporangiophores. The fungus could have been a zygomycete. The zygomycete was isolated from three blood cultures. The antifungal drug was changed from micafungin to liposomal amphotericin B, which resulted in an improvement in the patient's symptoms. Growth was observed at 37℃, but not 42℃ in a growth temperature test. Gene sequence analysis identified the fungus as <I>Mucor velutinosus</I>. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time <I>M. velutinosus</I> has been detected in Japan, and this case is very rare. Zygomycetes are known to be pathogens that cause fungal infections in immunodeficient patients such as those with leukemia. They are difficult to identify by culture and are identified at autopsy in many cases. Therefore, culture examinations should be performed for immunodeficient patients with the consideration of zygomycetes.

Journal

  • Medical Mycology Journal

    Medical Mycology Journal 55(2), E43-E48, 2014

    The Japanese Society for Medical Mycology

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130004567865
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA12518136
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    2185-6486
  • NDL Article ID
    025517323
  • NDL Call No.
    Z19-348
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
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