腸内細菌:宿主の健康と疾病への密接な関係  [in Japanese] GUT MICROBIOTA:CLOSELY RELATED TO HEALTH AND DISEASE OF THE HOST  [in Japanese]

Access this Article

Search this Article

Author(s)

    • 山城 雄一郎 YAMASHIRO YUICHIRO
    • 順天堂大学大学院医学研究科プロバイオティクス研究講座 PROBIOTICS RESEARCH LABORATORY, JUNTENDO UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Abstract

近年,細菌の検索に導入された菌の遺伝子DNAやリボゾーム16SrRNAをターゲットにした分子生物学的手法の普及により,ヒトの腸内細菌の動態が,培養不可でそれまで知りえなかった菌も含め,より詳細に明らかになってきた.ヒト成人の腸内細菌には,約500~1,000種,100兆個の菌が生着し,その構成の割合は食事(栄養)の影響を受けて生涯を通して変化し,また内的,外的な両方の環境の変動にも修飾されて敏感に反応する.<br>腸内細菌構成菌の変動は,分子シグナルを介して宿主の代謝と免疫など,生理,生化学的機能に影響し,宿主の健康と病的状態に密接に関係する.<br>胎児期に無菌の腸管は,出産時に産道を通過する際に母親から菌を獲得し腸管内へ生着が開始する.母乳栄養児では生後3ヵ月頃までにBifidobacteria優位の菌叢になり,生後6ヵ月頃には全体の90%以上を占めるようになる.しかし離乳食の導入に伴い,人工栄養児のそれと次第に差異は縮小する.他方未熟児は帝王切開(帝切)で出産する例が多く,母親から出産時に菌を獲得する機会を逸し,NICU等の環境から得る菌が最初に腸管へ生着する結果,腸内細菌構成の異常(dysbiosis)を生じ,新生児期の感染や壊死性腸炎(NEC)等の病的潜在リスクとなる.いわゆる善玉菌の腸内細菌,特にBifidobacteriaは,消化吸収,免疫を含む腸管防御等の腸管機能や解剖学的発達,成長に重要な役割を果たす.<br>腸内細菌と食事(栄養)は,相互に密接な関係を有する.食習慣は腸内細菌構成に影響を与え,蛋白質や動物性脂肪(高飽和脂肪酸)の食事摂取が多いとEnterobacteriaceae(Preteobacteria)の割合が多く,高炭水化物食はPrevotellaが増加する.腸内細菌は,食事中の難消化性炭水化物(食物繊維)を代謝,発酵し短鎖脂肪酸(SCFs)の酢酸,プロピオン酸,酪酸を主として産生する.酢酸とプロピオン酸は宿主の,酪酸は直腸上皮細胞それぞれのエネルギー源となる.また,腸内細菌は胆汁酸代謝,食事由来のcholine代謝に関与し,前者は脂質代謝や糖代謝,後者は動脈硬化の進展に関係する.<br>世界的な流行の様相を呈する肥満の元凶は,近代の社会環境の変化に基因したエネルギー摂取と消費のアンバランス,すなわち “西洋食” と称される高カロリー,高(飽和)脂肪食の摂取にある.高カロリー,高脂肪食はFirmicutes, Proteobacteriaの増加,Bacteroidetesの減少など,腸内細菌構成の異常dysbiosisを招く.これらの増加した菌はエネルギー産生や抽出能が高く,宿主の脂肪組織を増加させる.さらに細胞毒性かつ炎症惹起作用のあるリポポリサッカライドを産生し血中に吸収され(endotoxemia),軽度でしかし慢性の炎症を生じる.そのため,炎症性サイトカインが分泌され,インスリン抵抗性の原因となる.インスリン抵抗性が長期化すると2型糖尿病(T2DM)やその他のメタボリック症候群の高リスク因子となる.<br>共同研究者の佐藤淳子ら(順天堂大学代謝内分泌科)は,T2DM患者の腸内細菌が健常者のそれと異なり,その20数%で菌血症を伴うことを世界で初めて発表した.腸内細菌の異常は毒性のある二次胆汁酸産生を増加し,肝に運ばれ肝細胞癌の発症の原因になることをがん研究会の大谷らは報告している.大腸癌の一部も二次胆汁酸がその発症に関与していることが示唆される.<br>腸内細菌と宿主の免疫,代謝等の密接な関係から,腸内細菌のdysbiosisが宿主の健康と疾病に影響を及ぼす学術的エビデンスが近年急速に蓄積されてきている.これに伴いProbioticsによる健康管理,疾病の予防や治療をも見据えた研究も活発になり,近い未来の医療に大きなインパクトを与えるものと期待される.

Culture-independent methods to study microbial communities have advanced our knowledge of the human gut microbiota. The gut microbiota in humans includes various kinds of microorganism inhabiting the length and width of the gastrointestinal tract. The composition of the microbiota is host-specific, evolving throughout an individual’s lifetime and susceptible to both exogenous and endogenous modifications. It is estimated that the human gut microbiota contains as many as 10<sup>14</sup> bacterial cells and 500 to 1,000 species. The process of initial colonization of gut microbiota begins at the time of delivery, when the fetus leaves the germ-free intra-uterine environment and enters the extra-uterine setting. It is now well accepted that the colonization of bacteria, including <i>Bifidobacteria</i> and <i>Lactobacilli</i>, is necessary for the normal development of intestinal innate and adaptive defenses. Most preterm infants are delivered by cesarean (C) section for various reasons, so the transfer of bacteria from mother to infant is completely absent during the delivery; thus, infants delivered by C section are colonized with anaerobic bacteria later than vaginally delivered infants, leading to an unbalanced composition of the intestinal microbiota, namely, dysbiosis. Diet is known to modulate the composition of the gut microbiota in humans over the long term. The alteration of gut microbiota composition, dysbiosis, may contribute to the risk and pathogenesis of both undernutrition and overnutrition through effects on nutrient metabolism and immune function.<br>The nexus between nutrient metabolism and the immune system occurs at many levels, ranging from endocrine signaling to direct sensing of nutrients by immune cells. The ability to use macronutrients is essential for the generation and maintenance of a protective effector immune response. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) provide one of the clearest examples of how nutrient processing by the microbiota and host diet combine to shape immune responses. SCFAs are end products of the microbial fermentation of macronutrients, the most notable being plant polysaccharides that cannot be digested by humans.<br>Changes in lifestyle and an increase in the availability of energy-rich food are important contributors to the worldwide obesity epidemic. The microbial inhabitants of the gut can also have an influence on metabolic processes, such as energy extraction from food, and should be considered as an environmental factor that contributes to obesity and its comorbidities, such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and also cancer.<br>Accumulating evidence indicates that gut microbiota may be a target for preventing and treating obesity; this will require probiotics that are selected for specific clinical manifestations of metabolic syndrome.

Journal

  • Juntendo Medical Journal

    Juntendo Medical Journal 60(1), 25-34, 2014

    The Juntendo Medical Society

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130004684313
  • Text Lang
    JPN
  • Journal Type
    大学紀要
  • ISSN
    2187-9737
  • NDL Article ID
    025560010
  • NDL Call No.
    Z19-432
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
Page Top