Direct exposure of non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma confers simultaneous oxidative and ultraviolet modifications in biomolecules

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Author(s)

    • Okazaki Yasumasa
    • Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Hori Masaru
    • Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University
    • Toyokuni Shinya
    • Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Wang Yue
    • Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Tanaka Hiromasa
    • Plasma Nanotechnology Research Center, Nagoya University|Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Hospital
    • Mizuno Masaaki
    • Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Hospital
    • Nakamura Kae
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Kajiyama Hiroaki
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine
    • Uchida Koji
    • Laboratory of Food and Biodyamics, Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University
    • Kikkawa Fumitaka
    • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine

Abstract

Thermal plasmas and lasers are used in medicine to cut and ablate tissues and for coagulation. Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) is a recently developed, non-thermal technique with possible biomedical applications. Although NEAPP reportedly generates reactive oxygen/nitrogen species, electrons, positive ions, and ultraviolet radiation, little research has been done into the use of this technique for conventional free radical biology. Recently, we developed a NEAPP device with high electron density. Electron spin resonance spin-trapping revealed <sup>•</sup>OH as a major product. To obtain evidence of NEAPP-induced oxidative modifications in biomolecules and standardize them, we evaluated lipid peroxidation and DNA modifications in various <i>in vitro</i> and <i>ex vivo</i> experiments. Conjugated dienes increased after exposure to linoleic and α-linolenic acids. An increase in 2-thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was also observed after exposure to phosphatidylcholine, liposomes or liver homogenate. Direct exposure to rat liver in saline produced immunohistochemical evidence of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal- and acrolein-modified proteins. Exposure to plasmid DNA induced dose-dependent single/double strand breaks and increased the amounts of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that oxidative biomolecular damage by NEAPP is dose-dependent and thus can be controlled in a site-specific manner. Simultaneous oxidative and UV-specific DNA damage may be useful in cancer treatment.

Journal

  • Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition

    Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition 55(3), 207-215, 2014

    SOCIETY FOR FREE RADICAL RESEARCH JAPAN

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130004687669
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0912-0009
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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