Morphological and physiological characteristics of dermal photoreceptors in <i>Lymnaea stagnalis </i>

Access this Article

Author(s)

    • Takigami Satoshi
    • Graduate School of High-Technology for Human Welfare, Tokai University|Graduate School of Bioscience, Tokai University
    • Sunada Hiroshi
    • Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary
    • Horikoshi Tetsuro
    • Graduate School of High-Technology for Human Welfare, Tokai University|Graduate School of Bioscience, Tokai University |School of Engineering, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tokai University
    • Sakakibara Manabu
    • Graduate School of High-Technology for Human Welfare, Tokai University|Graduate School of Bioscience, Tokai University |School of High-Technology for Human Welfare, Tokai University

Abstract

Dermal photoreceptors located in the mantle of <i>Lymnaea stagnalis</i> were histologically and physiologically characterized. Our previous study demonstrated that the shadow response from dermal photoreceptors induces the whole-body withdrawal response. Through the interneuron, RPeD11, we detected that the light-off response indirectly originated from a dermal photoreceptor. Previous observations, based on behavioral pharmacology, revealed that cyclic guanosine monophosphate acts as a second messenger in the dermal photoreceptor. Furthermore, gastropods possess dermal photoreceptors containing rhodopsin, as a photopigment, and another photo-sensitive protein, arrestin, responsible for terminating the light response. Thus, we chose three antibodies, anti-cGMP, anti-rhodopsin, and anti-β-arrestin, to identify the dermal photoreceptor molecules in <i>Lymnaea</i> mantle. Extracellular recording, using a suction electrode on the mantle, revealed a light off-response from the right parietal nerve. Overlapping structures, positive against each of the antibodies, were also observed. Numerous round, granular particles of 3–47 μm in diameter with one nucleus were distributed around pneumostome and/or inside the mantle. The cells surrounding the pneumostome area, located 10 μm beneath the surface, tended to have smaller cell soma ranging from 3 to 25 μm in diameter, while cells located in other areas were distributed uniformly inside the mantle, with a larger diameter ranging from 12 to 47 μm. The histological examination using back-filing Lucifer Yellow staining of the right parietal nerve with the three dermal photoreceptor antibodies confirmed that these overlapping-stained structures were dermal photoreceptors in <i>Lymnaea</i>.

Journal

  • BIOPHYSICS

    BIOPHYSICS 10(0), 77-88, 2014

    The Biophysical Society of Japan

Codes

Page Top