Effect of dietary components on renal inorganic phosphate (Pi) excretion induced by a Pi-depleted diet

Access this Article

Search this Article

Author(s)

    • Ohnishi Ritsuko
    • Department of Molecular Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Tatsumi Sawako
    • Department of Molecular Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Hamada Yasuhiro
    • Department of Therapeutic Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Miyamoto Ken-ichi
    • Department of Molecular Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Segawa Hiroko
    • Department of Molecular Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Ohmoto Tomoyo
    • Department of Molecular Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Sasaki Shohei
    • Department of Molecular Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Hanazaki Ai
    • Department of Molecular Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Mori Ayaka
    • Department of Molecular Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Ikuta Kayo
    • Department of Molecular Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Furutani Junya
    • Department of Molecular Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School
    • Kawakami Eri
    • Department of Molecular Nutrition, Institution of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School

Abstract

Dietary inorganic phosphate (Pi) is the most important factor in the regulation of renal Pi excretion. Recent studies suggest the presence of an enteric-renal signaling axis for dietary Pi as well as the existence of a mechanism by which the intestine detects changes in luminal Pi concentrations. The mechanisms of intestinal Pi sensing, however, are unknown. In the present study, we focused on Pi depletion signals and investigated the effects of dietary components on intestinal Pi sensing. After feeding rats experimental diets for 3 days, we investigated urinary Pi excretion and plasma biochemical parameters. Renal Pi excretion was suppressed in rats fed a low-Pi diet (0.02% Pi). Elimination of dietary calcium (Ca) completely blocked the suppression of Pi excretion, suggesting that the presence of Ca is essential for the Pi depletion signal. Furthermore, a minimum Ca content of more than 0.02% was necessary for the Pi depletion signal. Magnesium, lanthanum, and strontium, which are agonists of calcium sensing receptor, instead of Ca, reduced Pi excretion. Therefore, dietary Ca appears to be important for the Pi depletion-sensing mechanism in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, the calcium sensing receptor may be involved in the Pi depletion signal. J. Med. Invest. 61: 162-170, February, 2014

Journal

  • The Journal of Medical Investigation

    The Journal of Medical Investigation 61(1.2), 162-170, 2014

    The University of Tokushima Faculty of Medicine

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130004822704
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA11166929
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • Article Type
    journal article
  • ISSN
    1343-1420
  • Data Source
    IR  J-STAGE 
Page Top