Biochemical responses to dietary .ALPHA.-linolenic acid restriction proceed differently among brain regions in mice

Access this Article

Author(s)

    • Miyazawa Daisuke
    • Kinjo Gakuin University College of Pharmacy, Open Research Center for Lipid Nutrition, 2-1723 Omori, Moriyamaku, Nagoya 463-8521, Japan
    • Yasui Yuko
    • Kinjo Gakuin University College of Pharmacy, Open Research Center for Lipid Nutrition, 2-1723 Omori, Moriyamaku, Nagoya 463-8521, Japan
    • Yamada Kazuyo
    • Kinjo Gakuin University College of Pharmacy, Open Research Center for Lipid Nutrition, 2-1723 Omori, Moriyamaku, Nagoya 463-8521, Japan
    • Ohara Naoki
    • Kinjo Gakuin University College of Pharmacy, Open Research Center for Lipid Nutrition, 2-1723 Omori, Moriyamaku, Nagoya 463-8521, Japan
    • Okuyama Harumi
    • Kinjo Gakuin University College of Pharmacy, Open Research Center for Lipid Nutrition, 2-1723 Omori, Moriyamaku, Nagoya 463-8521, Japan

Abstract

Previously, we noted that the dietary restriction of α-linolenic acid (ALA, n-3) for 4 weeks after weaning brought about significant decreases in the BDNF content and p38 MAPK activity in the striatum of mice, but not in the other regions of the brain, compared with an ALA- and linoleic acid (LNA, n-6)-adequate diet. In this study, we examined whether a prolonged dietary manipulation induces biochemical changes in other regions of the brain as well. Mice were fed a safflower oil (SAF) diet (ALA-restricted, LNA-adequate) or a perilla oil (PER) diet (containing adequate amounts of ALA and LNA) for 8 weeks from weaning. The docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) contents and p38 MAPK activities in the cerebral cortex, striatum and hippocampus were significantly lower in the SAF group. The BDNF contents and protein kinase C (PKC) activities in the cerebral cortex as well as in the striatum, but not in the hippocampus, were significantly lower in the SAF group. These data indicate that the biochemical changes induced by the dietary restriction of ALA have a time lag in the striatum and cortex, suggesting that the signal is transmitted through decreased p38 MAPK activity and BDNF content and ultimately decreased PKC activity.

Journal

  • Biomedical Research

    Biomedical Research 32(4), 237-245, 2011

    Biomedical Research Press

Codes

Page Top