Potential roles of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 in rheumatoid arthritis

Access this Article

Search this Article

Author(s)

    • Kojima Fumiaki
    • Department of Pharmacology, Asahikawa Medical University|Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky
    • Matnani Rahul G.
    • Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky
    • Kawai Shinichi
    • Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Toho University School of Medicine
    • Crofford Leslie J.
    • Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kentucky

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease which primarily affects the synovial joints leading to inflammation, pain and joint deformities. Nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and glucocorticoids, both of which inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX), have been extensively used for treating RA patients. Prostaglandin E synthase (PGES) is a specific biosynthetic enzyme that acts downstream of COX and converts prostaglandin (PG) H<SUB>2</SUB> to PGE<SUB>2</SUB>. Among PGES isozymes, microsomal PGES-1 (mPGES-1) has been shown to be induced in a variety of cells and tissues under inflammatory conditions. The induction of mPGES-1 in the synovial tissue of RA patients is closely associated with the activation of the tissue by proinflammatory cytokines. Although selective mPGES-1 inhibitors have not yet been widely available, mice lacking mPGES-1 (mPGES-1<SUP>-/-</SUP> mice) have been generated to evaluate the physiological and pathological roles of mPGES-1 in vivo. Recent studies utilizing mPGES-1<SUP>-/-</SUP> mice have demonstrated the significance of mPGES-1 in the process of chronic inflammation and evocation of humoral immune response in autoimmune arthritis models. These recent findings highlight mPGES-1 as a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including RA. Currently, both natural and synthetic chemicals are being tested for inhibition of mPGES-1 activity to produce PGE<SUB>2</SUB>. The present review focuses on the recent advances in understanding the role of mPGES-1 in the pathophysiology of RA.

Journal

  • Inflammation and Regeneration

    Inflammation and Regeneration 31(2), 157-166, 2011

    The Japanese Society of Inflammation and Regeneration

Codes

Page Top