Correlations between the Broad Autism Phenotype and social cognition among mothers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder  [in Japanese]

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Author(s)

    • Hasegawa Kyoko Hasegawa Kyoko
    • United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University and Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui
    • Sakai Saeko Sakai Saeko
    • United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University and Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui
    • Okuno Hiroko [他] Okuno Hiroko
    • United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University and Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui
    • Eto Moe
    • United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University and Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui
    • Kagitani-Shimono Kuriko
    • United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University and Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui
    • Mohri Ikuko
    • United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University and Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui
    • Taniike Masako
    • United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University and Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui

Abstract

The present study examined the relation between Broad Autism Phenotype (BAP) tendencies and social cognition in mothers who had a child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in Japan. The participants of this study were 51 mothers who had a child with ASD. The survey consisted of a questionnaire (BAPQ-J) and four social cognition tasks. The results indicated a cultural difference in “pragmatic language.” Next, those who scored higher on the total BAPQ-J or on the “rigid” subscale had greater difficulty in reading emotions in situations without happy facial cues or surprised facial cues. Additionally, these individuals had greater difficulty with complex judgments, such as judging trustworthiness, from movements and multiple facial stimuli. In summary, BAP and social cognition have some correlation in mothers who have children with ASD.

Journal

  • JAPANESE JOURNAL OF RESEARCH ON EMOTIONS

    JAPANESE JOURNAL OF RESEARCH ON EMOTIONS 21(3), 143-155, 2014

    JAPAN SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH ON EMOTIONS

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130004953098
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA11429846
  • Text Lang
    JPN
  • ISSN
    1882-8817
  • NDL Article ID
    025704175
  • NDL Call No.
    Z74-D298
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
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