<b>Hyaline cartilage formation and tumorigenesis of implanted tissues derived from human induced pluripotent stem </b><b>cells </b>

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Author(s)

    • SAITO Taku
    • Bone and Cartilage Regenerative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo|Sensory & Motor System Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo
    • NAKAUCHI Hiromitsu
    • Division of Stem Cell Therapy, Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo
    • CHUNG Ung-il
    • Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo
    • TANAKA Sakae
    • Sensory & Motor System Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo
    • YANO Fumiko
    • Bone and Cartilage Regenerative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo|Sensory & Motor System Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo|Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo
    • MORI Daisuke
    • Bone and Cartilage Regenerative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo
    • KAWATA Manabu
    • Sensory & Motor System Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo
    • HOSHI Kazuto
    • Sensory & Motor System Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo
    • TAKATO Tsuyoshi
    • Sensory & Motor System Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tokyo
    • MASAKI Hideki
    • Division of Stem Cell Therapy, Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo
    • OTSU Makoto
    • Division of Stem Cell Therapy, Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo
    • ETO Koji
    • Division of Stem Cell Therapy, Center for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo|Clinical Application Department, Center for iPS Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University

Abstract

Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a promising cell source for cartilage regenerative medicine. Meanwhile, the risk of tumorigenesis should be considered in the clinical application of human iPSCs (hiPSCs). Here, we report <i>in vitro</i> chondrogenic differentiation of hiPSCs and maturation of the differentiated hiPSCs through transplantation into mouse knee joints. Three hiPSC clones showed efficient chondrogenic differentiation using an established protocol for human embryonic stem cells. The differentiated hiPSCs formed hyaline cartilage tissues at 8 weeks after transplantation into the articular cartilage of NOD/SCID mouse knee joints. Although tumors were not observed during the 8 weeks after transplantation, an immature teratoma had developed in one mouse at 16 weeks. In conclusion, hiPSCs are a potent cell source for regeneration of hyaline articular cartilage. However, the risk of tumorigenesis should be managed for clinical application in the future.

Journal

  • Biomedical Research

    Biomedical Research 36(3), 179-186, 2015

    Biomedical Research Press

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