Highly Sensitive Imaging of Cancer with Functional Nanoparticles

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Author(s)

    • Gonda Kohsuke
    • Department of Medical Physics, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University| Department of Nano-Medical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University
    • Hamada Yoh
    • Department of Nano-Medical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University
    • Kitamura Narufumi
    • Department of Nano-Medical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University| Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University
    • Tada Hiroshi
    • Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University
    • Miyashita Minoru
    • Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University
    • Kamei Takashi
    • Department of Advanced Surgical Science and Technology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University
    • Ishida Takanori
    • Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University
    • Ohuchi Noriaki
    • Department of Nano-Medical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University| Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Tohoku University

Abstract

It is important for cancer therapy to understand cancer mechanisms and develop a diagnostic method. We have developed a method for in vivo imaging with very high spatial accuracy (~9 nm) under a confocal microscope and succeeded in tracking the membrane protein during metastasis in living mice. We found that the tumor cells showed increases in membrane fluidity (over 1000-fold) and formed local pseudopodia in the process of metastasis, suggesting that membrane fluidity and morphological changes are critical for metastasis. To develop a novel immunohistochemistry (IHC), we newly-made organic fluorescent material-assembled nanoparticles. These nanoparticles have 1000-fold greater fluorescent intensity compared to representative organic fluorescent material. Consequently, the fluorescence of these nanoparticles exhibited a significantly high signal-to-noise ratio on IHC-imaged cancer tissue, including high-level autofluorescence. The IHC method using these nanoparticles was applied for the identification of estrogen receptor-expression levels in breast cancer tissue. The results demonstrated that the diagnostic accuracy and quantitative sensitivity were greatly improved compared to previous IHC methods. This technique would be useful for the prediction of clinical responses to ER-targeted therapy.

Journal

  • Journal of Photopolymer Science and Technology

    Journal of Photopolymer Science and Technology 28(6), 731-736, 2015

    The Society of Photopolymer Science and Technology(SPST)

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