A pathological study of the salivary glands of rabid dogs in the Philippines

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Author(s)

    • KIMITSUKI Kazunori
    • Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23–35–1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034–8628, Japan
    • SHIMATSU Taichi
    • Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23–35–1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034–8628, Japan
    • SHIWA Nozomi
    • Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23–35–1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034–8628, Japan
    • SHINOZAKI Harumi
    • Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23–35–1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034–8628, Japan
    • TAKAHASHI Yurika
    • Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23–35–1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034–8628, Japan
    • TANAKA Naoto
    • Department of Veterinary Pathology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Kitasato University, 23–35–1 Higashi, Towada, Aomori 034–8628, Japan
    • INOUE Satoshi
    • Department of Veterinary Science, National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Toyama 1–23–1, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162–8640, Japan

Abstract

Rabies is a zoonotic disease caused by the rabies virus. While the salivary glands are important as exit and propagation sites for the rabies virus, the mechanisms of rabies excretion remain unclear. Here, we investigated the histopathology of the salivary glands of rabid dogs and analyzed the mechanism of excretion into the oral cavity. Mandibular and parotid glands of 22 rabid dogs and three control dogs were used. Mild to moderate non-suppurative sialadenitis was observed in the mandibular glands of 19 of the 22 dogs, characterized by loss of acinar epithelium and infiltration by lymphoplasmacytic cells. Viral antigens were detected in the mucous acinar epithelium, ganglion neurons and myoepithelium. Acinar epithelium and lymphocytes were positive for anti-caspase-3 antibodies and TUNEL staining. In contrast, no notable findings were observed in the ductal epithelial cells and serous demilune. In the parotid gland, the acinar cells, myoepithelium and ductal epithelium all tested negative. These findings confirmed the path through which the rabies virus descends along the facial nerve after proliferation in the brain to reach the ganglion neurons of the mandibular gland, subsequently traveling to the acinar epithelium via the salivary gland myoepithelium. Furthermore, the observation that nerve endings passing through the myoepithelium were absent from the ductal system suggested that viral proliferation and cytotoxicity could not occur there, ensuring that secretions containing the virus are efficiently excreted into the oral cavity.

Journal

  • Journal of Veterinary Medical Science

    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 78(1), 35-42, 2016

    JAPANESE SOCIETY OF VETERINARY SCIENCE

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130005121596
  • NII NACSIS-CAT ID (NCID)
    AA10796138
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0916-7250
  • NDL Article ID
    027077386
  • NDL Call No.
    Z18-350
  • Data Source
    NDL  J-STAGE 
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