New ultrasonography-based method for predicting total skeletal muscle mass in male athletes

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Author(s)

    • Toda Yoko
    • Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, Mukogawa Women's University, Japan
    • Kimura Tetsuya
    • Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University, Japan
    • Taki Chinami
    • Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University, Japan
    • Kurihara Toshiyuki
    • Graduate School of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University: 1-1-1 Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577, Japan
    • Homma Toshiyuki
    • Department of Sports Science, Faculty of Sports and Health Science, Daito Bunka University, Japan
    • Hamaoka Takafumi
    • Department of Sports Medicine for Health Promotion, Tokyo Medical University, Japan
    • Sanada Kiyoshi
    • Graduate School of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University: 1-1-1 Noji-higashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577, Japan

Abstract

[Purpose] This study aimed 1) to assess whether a prediction model for whole body skeletal muscle mass that is based on a sedentary population is applicable to young male athletes, and 2) to develop a new skeletal muscle mass prediction model for young male athletes. [Subjects and Methods] The skeletal muscle mass of 61 male athletes was measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and estimated using a previous prediction model (Sanada et al., 2006) with B-mode ultrasonography. The prediction model was not suitable for young male athletes, as a significant difference was observed between the means of the estimated and MRI-measured skeletal muscle mass. Next, the same subjects were randomly assigned to a development or validation group, and a new model specifically relevant to young male athletes was developed based on MRI and ultrasound data obtained from the development group. [Results] A strong correlation was observed between the skeletal muscle mass estimated by the new model and the MRI-measured skeletal muscle mass (r=0.96) in the validation group, without significant difference between their means. No bias was found in the new model using Bland-Altman analysis (r=−0.25). [Conclusion] These results validate the new model and suggest that ultrasonography is a reliable method for measuring skeletal muscle mass in young male athletes.

Journal

  • Journal of Physical Therapy Science

    Journal of Physical Therapy Science 28(5), 1556-1559, 2016

    The Society of Physical Therapy Science

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130005154568
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0915-5287
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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