Quantitative Assessment of Head Motion toward Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging during Stepping

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Author(s)

    • SAOTOME Kousaku
    • Center for Cybernics Research, University of Tsukuba|Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Science Majors of Medical Sciences, University of Tsukuba
    • MATSUSHITA Akira
    • Center for Cybernics Research, University of Tsukuba|Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tsukuba
    • NAKAI Kei
    • Department of Neurosurgery, University of Tsukuba
    • SANKAI Yoshiyuki
    • Center for Cybernics Research, University of Tsukuba|Graduate School of Systems and Information Engineering, University of Tsukuba

Abstract

Purpose: Stepping motions have been often used as gait-like patterns in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to understand gait control. However, it is still very difficult to stabilize the task-related head motion. Our main purpose is to provide characteristics of the task-related head motion during stepping to develop robust restraints toward fMRI.<br>Methods: Multidirectional head and knee position during stepping were acquired using a motion capture system outside MRI room in 13 healthy participants. Six phases in a stepping motion were defined by reference to the left knee angles and the mean of superior-inferior head velocity (<i>V<sub>mean</sub></i>) in each phase was investigated. Furthermore, the correlation between the standard deviation of the knee angle (<i>θ<sub>sd</sub></i>) and the maximum of the head velocity (<i>V<sub>max</sub></i>) was evaluated.<br>Results: The standard deviation of each superior-inferior head position and pitch were significantly larger than the other measurements. <i>V<sub>mean</sub></i> showed a characteristic repeating pattern associated with the knee angle. Additionally, there were significant correlations between <i>θ<sub>sd</sub></i> and <i>V<sub>max</sub></i>.<br> Conclusions: This is the first report to reveal the characteristics of the task-related head motion during stepping. Our findings are an essential step in the development of robust restraint toward fMRI during stepping task.

Journal

  • Magnetic Resonance in Medical Sciences

    Magnetic Resonance in Medical Sciences 15(3), 273-280, 2016

    Japanese Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

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