The relationship between the load on the knee joint during walking and the biomechanical characteristics of single-leg standing

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Author(s)

    • Chiba Takeshi
    • Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Japan
    • Yamanaka Masanori
    • Department of Rehabilitation Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University: West 5, North 12, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812, Japan
    • Samukawa Mina
    • Department of Rehabilitation Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University: West 5, North 12, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812, Japan
    • Saito Hiroshi
    • Department of Rehabilitation Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University: West 5, North 12, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812, Japan
    • Sabashi Kento
    • Graduate School of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, Japan
    • Tohyama Harukazu
    • Department of Rehabilitation Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Hokkaido University: West 5, North 12, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812, Japan

Abstract

<p> [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between the external knee adduction moment (KAM) during walking and the biomechanical characteristics of single-leg standing in healthy subjects. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight healthy subjects were recruited for this study. Data were collected while the subjects performed walking and single-leg standing using a motion analysis system with six digital video cameras and two force plates. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to quantify the relationship between peak KAM during walking and single-leg standing. To determine whether the kinematic behavior of the pelvis and trunk during single-leg standing are associated with peak KAM during walking, Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated and stepwise linear regression was performed. [Results] The peak KAM during single-leg standing was significantly correlated with that during walking. The peak KAM during walking was significantly correlated with the peak lateral lean of the trunk and the peak lateral tilt of the pelvis during single-leg standing. The results of stepwise linear regression analysis show the peak KAM during walking was partially explained by the peak lateral lean of the trunk during single-leg standing. [Conclusion] Our findings suggest that single-leg standing might be a useful method for predicting the peak KAM during walking.</p>

Journal

  • Journal of Physical Therapy Science

    Journal of Physical Therapy Science 28(8), 2199-2203, 2016

    The Society of Physical Therapy Science

Codes

  • NII Article ID (NAID)
    130005261764
  • Text Lang
    ENG
  • ISSN
    0915-5287
  • Data Source
    J-STAGE 
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