The molecular and cellular mechanisms of itch and the involvement of TRP channels in the peripheral sensory nervous system and skin  [in Japanese] The molecular and cellular mechanisms of itch and the involvement of TRP channels in the peripheral sensory nervous system and skin  [in Japanese]

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Author(s)

    • Kittaka Hiroki
    • Division of Cell Signaling, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, National Institutes of Natural Sciences
    • Tominaga Makoto
    • Division of Cell Signaling, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, National Institutes of Natural Sciences|Department of Physiological Sciences, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies|Institute for Environmental and Gender-specific Medicine, Juntendo University

Abstract

<p>Itch is an unpleasant cutaneous sensation that can arise following insect bites, exposure to plant in-gredients, and some diseases. Itch can also have idiopathic causes. Itch sensations are thought to protect against external insults and toxic substances. Although itch is not directly lethal, chronic and long lasting itch in certain diseases can worsen quality of life. Therefore, the mechanisms responsible for chronic itch require careful investigation. There is a significant amount of basic research concerning itch, and the effect of various itch mediators on primary sensory neurons have been studied. Interestingly, many mediators of itch involve signaling related to transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels, especially thermosensitive TRP channels, are expressed by primary sensory neurons and skin kerati-nocytes, which receive multimodal stimuli, including those that cause itch sensations. Here we review the molecular and cellular mechanisms of itch and the involvement of TRP channels in mediating itch sensations.</p>

<p>Itch is an unpleasant cutaneous sensation that can arise following insect bites, exposure to plant in-gredients, and some diseases. Itch can also have idiopathic causes. Itch sensations are thought to protect against external insults and toxic substances. Although itch is not directly lethal, chronic and long lasting itch in certain diseases can worsen quality of life. Therefore, the mechanisms responsible for chronic itch require careful investigation. There is a significant amount of basic research concerning itch, and the effect of various itch mediators on primary sensory neurons have been studied. Interestingly, many mediators of itch involve signaling related to transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. TRP channels, especially thermosensitive TRP channels, are expressed by primary sensory neurons and skin kerati-nocytes, which receive multimodal stimuli, including those that cause itch sensations. Here we review the molecular and cellular mechanisms of itch and the involvement of TRP channels in mediating itch sensations.</p>

Journal

  • Allergology International

    Allergology International 66(1), 22-30, 2017

    Japanese Society of Allergology

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